lactose

Say Cheese! I bet you didn’t know…

Many will immediately have warm comfort food feelings. Cheese is said to have been around for around 8,000 years. Cheese is even mentioned in the bible and is thought to likely have started with sheep and goats. A cheese’s nutritional content is largely determined by the animal it came from and what foods it ate. This week we talk all things cheese! Is it good? Is it bad? Is it healthy? What do you think?

Good or Bad?

If you’re not lactose intolerant, cheese can be a good source of calcium, fat, and protein. It also contains high amounts of vitamins A and B-12, along with zinc, phosphorus, and riboflavin. On the flip side, cheese is typically high in saturated fat and calories, so eating too much can pose health problems in addition to weight gain.

TIP: to “have your cheese and eat it too”, opt for using higher flavor cheeses (Havarti, aged white cheddar, etc) as more of a garnish or topping vs a main component in a dish.

Is All Cheese Made Equal?

Some of the healthiest cheeses include feta, blue cheese, ricotta, cottage cheese and mozzarella.

TIP: Try a new healthier dessert (it sounds weird, but we promise, it’s great!)!
– ½ Cup fat free ricotta
– 1 TBSP unsweetened cocoa powder
– sweetener of choice (stevia, honey, maple syrup, etc)
– add nuts, fruit, etc to add other flavors and textures

Lactose Intolerant?

Whether cheese is deemed a “good” or “bad” food, not everyone can tolerate milk products, more specifically lactose, equally. Lactose intolerance includes symptoms of abdominal cramping, bloating, and/or diarrhea after consuming lactose.

Cheeses lower in lactose are: aged cheddar, parmesan, and swiss cheeses. Higher lactose cheeses include: cheese spreads, soft cheeses like Brie, cottage cheese, and mozzarella.

Did You Know?

90% of Wisconsin milk is made into cheese! Cheddar cheese was first manufactured in England and is hands down the most widely purchased and eaten cheese in the entire world!

Wisconsin is known as the dairy state for good reason. Over 25%, and over 600 varieties, of the country’s cheese comes from Wisconsin!

TIP: Grating a softer cheese? Try sticking the cheese in the freezer for 20 minutes before grating to keep the mess at bay.

Get even more cheesy info here!