warm up

Six Trainer Tips for Maximizing Your Program

You can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will.”

~ Stephen King

Your trainer can do a lot for you, and well they should – that is what you pay them for after all! But there are some things that YOU must do in order to maximize the benefits from the work you putting in, before you can display any dissatisfaction with your program or lack of results.

Six Things You Must Do To Get The Most Out Of Your Program!

#1 – Foam Roll!

Before. After. At home while you watch TV. On the weekends. Foam rolling is maybe your best tool for preventing injury during workouts, improving your mobility so you can ingrain new functional movement patterns that will last, and improving recovery after workouts! Roll muscle bellies, avoid ligaments, tendons, bony processes and soft areas.

#2 – Do Your Homework!

The buck does not stop with foam rolling before sessions, consider adding mobility work into your daily routine to help open up your problem areas and allow you better movement. Your trainer should already know your tighter, less mobile areas so just ask for some suggestions. Froggers/Quad Rocks for tight hips; Inchworms for hamstrings; Lat Activation for shoulder mobility, etc.

#3 – Acknowledge Your Limitations!

There is ALWAYS a way to regress a movement pattern so that you can be more successful at it. It’s one thing to challenge yourself – and of course you should; it is another to force yourself into an injurious position you are not ready for! To push yourself beyond your limits will reduce and not expand them, working within the edge of your ability is how we get stronger without setbacks, complications and extreme hardship! It has to feel like work, but it doesn’t have to feel like suffering.

#4 – Ask for Progressions!

If you find yourself complacently meandering through a movement wondering why you are wasting your time, point it out to your trainer! We know sometimes people don’t want to be spotlighted or viewed as a show-off, but more than likely if it’s THAT easy you are probably missing a key point of the exercise. Help us help you by keeping open communication about what you’re feeling. Which brings us to our next tip…

#5 – Give Us Feedback!

Let us know what you like or don’t like, and WHY – If you don’t like it because it just feels too hard, maybe it’s time to talk about regressions so you can feel successful. If it hurts your back, knees, neck etc most likely something has gone awry with your movement pattern or a latent injury is rearing its head – both of which your trainer may be able to figure out ways to work around and ultimately help you overcome!

#6 – Do Your Part In The Kitchen!

All the training in the world won’t compensate for poor diet, and we have numerous blog posts that can help steer you in the right direction there. Whether you want to lose weight, bulk up, improve your athletic performance or just reduce your risk of developing the major diseases (CVD, Atherosclerosis, Diabetes, etc.) a major component of reaching your goals is going to be what you put into your body when you are not with your trainer.

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We can’t push you to be your best if you are dehydrated or if you are dizzy due to low blood sugar or sluggish due to a belly full because you ate 20 minutes before your session. Get to know your body, try different things and see what works best for you! Below are some resources for more information on nutrition!

What to Eat, When to Eat and What it Means for Your Workouts.

Junk Food Disguised as Health Food

Clean Eating With Convenience

Water and Weight Loss

Five Stretches You Shouldn’t Live Without!

…and sometimes – it is that simple!

Flexibility and “warming up” are two of the most highly underrated fitness principles around. Sure, many people warm up before an intense workout, but what about the rest of your day? As soon as you wake up – what has your body been doing for the last several hours? Lying still.

As soon as you step foot out of bed you begin placing demands on your body to lift, bend, and hustle around to keep up with your day. Start your day with a bit of injury prevention and increased blood flow, and you might be amazed at how it makes you feel.

Start from the ground up!

Plantar Fasciitis and other foot issues can make stepping out of bed painful or challenging due to the foot being in a pointed position through much of the night. Try flexing the foot up towards you and holding for 20 seconds 3-5x/foot. This can be done by sitting on floor and using a towel to pull the upper foot toward you. Or sit on your heels with shins and feet flexed under you. Sit back on your heels for the same amount of time. If you have a step nearby, you can also let your heels hang off of it like you would a calf stretch. All these movements bring your toes closer to your shin in a flexed position, stretching the foot fascia, and helping you get ready for the day!

The World’s Greatest Stretch??

We didn’t name it, but with a name like that it has some serious expectations to live up to, and it does a decent job! This awakens all the major muscle of the body. Hold each position for a few seconds and perform 3 movement patterns per side. This stretch is great to utilize throughout the day since it also stretches out the main muscles affected by sitting for long periods of time!

Watch the video to see what the buzz is about!

Wake up your spine!

The Cat/Cow Stretch can help relieve tension in your spine, morning or night, by opening it up and decompressing vertebrae. Set up in a quadruped position (all-fours: wrists under shoulders, knees under hips) and inhale while gently moving the chest/belly toward the floor so the spine is in extension. Exhale as you press into your hands, tuck the tailbone under, pull the chin toward the chest and round the back upward allowing the shoulder blades to move apart. Perform 10 reps or as many as you have time for.

You’ve got a litte tension in the those shoulders…

Wake up the spine and shoulders in the morning by simply standing and standing tall & reaching the arms overhead as if trying to reach the ceiling. Then work into a reverse shoulder stretch – clasping the arms behind you and lifting hands gently toward the ceiling near your edge and hold for 20 seconds.

Get off my back already!

Several statistical analyses have put the number of Americans suffering from chronic back pain above 10%. Our spine is the root of basically all movement, so we are driving home the importance of maintaining mobility and joint health in your back!

The Cobra stretch awakens the body with full extension of the spine, neck, shoulders, and chest. Lay on the floor, belly down. Place your hands under your shoulders, press into the floor, and lift the chest. Keep the abdominal muscles turned on, and draw the inner thighs towards each other to avoid hinging at the low back.

Watch the video for a demonstration!

True or False: Stretching before Exercise Reduces Injury

A myth is defined by Webster as : a usually traditional story of ostensibly historical events that serves to unfold part of the world view of a people or explain a practice, belief, or natural phenomenon an untrue explanation for a natural phenomenon. Stretching before exercise to reduce injury is one of those myths.

Historically, it has been generally accepted that stretching decreases the risk of injury. This myth is based on the idea that pre-exercise stretching reduces the risk of injury through improvements in range of motion and blood flow, better proprioception and decreased stiffness in the muscle (Fredette, 2001). 
The fact that authority figures (e.g., coaches and sports medicine doctors) have long practiced pre-exercise stretching for lowering injury risk is likely the reason it has been so widely accepted as standard practice. However, researchers began to more closely scrutinize the evidence supporting this. Recently, Witvrouw and colleagues (2004) concluded that pre-exercise stretching has no beneficial effect on injury prevention for activities such as cycling, jogging and swimming. Also, in a current review (McHugh and Cosgrave, 2010), the general consensus was that stretching in addition to aerobic warm-up does not affect the incidence of overuse injuries.
Does this mean stretching has no impact on risk of injury? Absolutely not! In fact, it has been reported that stretching at other times, including post exercise and in the evening, can reduce injury risk. At Ellipse Fitness we do what we call a RAMP prior to our workouts. RAMP stands for Range of Motion, Activation and Movement Preparation. We work on movement patterns that we’ll be doing that day in effort to prepare the body for the workout.  We also suggest foam rolling prior to a workout, however we strongly suggest, in the essence of not wasting time, that our members save the stretches for AFTER their workout, when the muscles are warmed up and ready for the TRUE BENEFIT that stretching provides.
The Bottom Line: Stretching before exercise DOES NOT reduce the risk of injury