kettlebell

10*20*30 Workout

This workout is ideal for summer travels. Choose any single circuit and repeat AMRAP for an exhilarating vacation workout! 8 Min AMRAP Circuits.

10 Burpees
20 Body Weight Squats
30 Jacks
*repeat AMRAP for 8 minutes

10 Pull Ups or Pull Downs
20 TRX Triceps Extensions
30 Reverse Fly w/Tube
*repeat AMRAP for 8 minutes

10 Pushups or Plank w/Hip Tap
20 Bicep Curls
30 Sprinter Starts (no TRX)
*repeat AMRAP for 8 minutes

10/10 Split Squats or Plyo Lunges
20 Shoulder Press
30 In & Out Squats
*repeat AMRAP for 8 minutes

Don’t have access to any equipment? Try repeating the first section 5 rounds for time!

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Why on Earth Do We Keep Lifting These Heavy Things??

It is frequently thought, pondered, and questioned, but often this question is not directly asked. Recently a former member inquired:

Why does we push heavy lifting here at Ellipse Fitness?

We can start with the 7 basics that most fitness professionals, weight loss experts, and physical therapist agree with.

7 Basic Reasons to Strength training and Lift Heavy

1. Builds confidence.
2. Burns more fat.
3. Strengthen bones.
4. Builds and strengthens muscles.
5. Prevents injury.
6. Improves endurance.
7. Defines the shape of a human body.

Enough said. Let’s just lift heavy, right? If only it were that simple…

The 4 Problems with Heavy Lifting

1. The term heavy is subjective. For so many of us, our body weight is heavy enough until we can move through the entire range of motion for any prescribed movement pattern. (That is semi-fancy trainer talk for perform an exercise, like a squat, correctly and without a load)

2. Adding a load and knowing when to increase it is confusing. Start small and increase minimally overtime. Increasing weights 2.5% each week or two can deliver amazing results overtime. The key is consistency. One heavy session is more likely to cause soreness, pain or injury as opposed to a progressive training program. Earning each pound added to any movement is required. Try adding load in small increments over the course of 4 weeks.

3. Fear of bulking up is something women tend to worry about more often than men. Some trainers respond with a line about women not having enough testosterone to bulk up, but the problem with this statement is not that it is entirely untrue – which is is. The problem is that the statement doesn’t even address the concerns of the client! Some women do build muscle fast and feel like they are bulking up. Many factors can be considered in this situation. Consuming too many calories, lifting too heavy too soon, etc. Accepting myths about women that change your perception like the “long, lean Pilates look.” That’s not real! We can’t lengthen muscles! These muscles are as long as they are going to be for adults. What we can do is tone and strengthen and maybe most importantly improve your health and quality of life.

4. Lifting as heavy as possible is not recommended every day. Discuss with your trainer how often you should lift heavy, max out, or PR (Personal Record). Muscles need recovery time to avoid injury. Limited recovery time is one of the most prominent issues we see. We are impressed by those who want to give 110% all the time. Inspiring? Of course. Smart? Maybe not always. Proper nutrition, sleep, stretching and foam rolling, and rest is the realm in which our bodies get stronger. Think about it. Lifting heavy causes fatigue and muscle soreness. We cannot, and should not, lift as heavy as possible again until we are fully recovered.

Program design plays a pivotal role in increasing muscle strength and endurance, changing the shape of our bodies, and fat loss. Ellipse Fitness provides many opportunities, on various days of the week, to lift heavy. When scheduling your sessions or selecting your weights on any given day, decide which day is best for you to lift heavy based on what physical activities you’ve planned for the rest of the week, whether you have time to eat a high quality meal near your workout, whether or not you expect to get a full night of sleep, etc. Discuss with your coach/trainer. Goal setting sessions are always available to our members.

Small group sessions allow our members to make strength training a priority. These sessions are available several days a week to ensure that we can get and stay strong. Custom programing is available for our members who have specific goals or limitations.

How heavy is heavy?

I don’t want to be a body builder. Do I really need to bench press my weight?

I don’t like Turkish Get Ups. Why do we do them?

I heard a loaded carry should be 75% of my body weight for 100 yards. Is this true?

We will find many landmarks for activities such as these. It is important to train the body to maintain strength. Once we stop challenging ourselves or even just visiting our perceived limitations, we begin to lose strength and definition. Our work capacity lowers. Our ability to get up and down off the floor weakens. We lose strength. We fall. We break bones. We gain fat. We lose confidence.

WHY should we lift heavy?

Because we can, and because it will ensure that we can into the future.

Ready…Aim…Higher!

Goals! You just gotta have ’em!

It’s well into the new year and whether you had a resolution or not, you may have goals that have not come to fruition. It might just be how you went about forming your goal in the first place! Let’s talk about how to set solid and attainable goals.

Here’s a great example that I know many of us could work on: “I want to drink ½ my bodyweight in ounces of water every day for the next 30 days.” There is a how much, how often, and it is realistic!

Set a Deadline!

Just like an open-ended work project, you will likely keep pushing it off knowing you can do it tomorrow…or never. Consider having both short term and longer-term goals ranging from this week to 6 weeks to 6 months to a year. Your long term goals can have shorter sub-goals within them that will help you reach them – get creative! Just be sure to set a deadline.

Write it Down!

Why is your goal important to you? WRITE it down. If it doesn’t make you tear up a bit, it may not be important enough for you to follow through with! In the example above, drinking water, maybe you’ve been excessively fatigued, and you regularly walk around dehydrated. Your fatigue causes you to say no to playing with your kids, getting your “me” time running with your friend, or missing other life events that are important to you.

Writing goals and the “why” for them makes everything more real, and when goals are more real they are more attainable!

Be Prepared to Sacrifice!

Not everything of course! But if it required no changes to achieve your goal well, you’d have already achieved it now wouldn’t you?

You may want to ask yourself, “Is this something I’m willing to give up what I want NOW for what I want MOST?” If it’s not, you may not be ready for your goal. In our example of water, you may be craving that coffee, soda, or other habitual food/snack that is taking you away from your goal. There will be challenges along the way, but choosing rewarding goals will ultimately overcome and outweigh any strife involved in reaching them. Just make sure your goals are healthy and realistic!

Confide in Someone!

Share your goal with a confidant; a friend, your trainer, a family member, or someone you feel safe with but accountable to. Be sure to communicate to the person you share it with that you want them to hold you accountable! And that you want them to call you out if you are not taking proper steps toward your goal or perhaps taking steps away from it. One more thing that’s very important – don’t get mad at them for taking you seriously!

List Action Steps!

List at least 3 action steps you are going to take in order to achieve your goal. In the case of drinking more water:
1) I am going to buy a 40 ounce water bottle and make sure to consume 2 (assuming ~160 lbs person) servings a day.
2) I am going to keep the bottle with me wherever I go so I don’t have a reason not to sip regularly.
3) I will start by drinking 12 ounces of water first thing in the morning when I wake up.

Of course you can list more than 3 steps, you can even list steps you can take daily to move in the right direction, but the purpose of the exercise is not to get discouraged by those lofty goals you’ve set. Bring them down to Earth by listing concrete steps you can take to make them happen!

The Inside Scoop (Part II)

Welcome back to day-to-day life for those of you who’ve been traveling or “Up North” as they say here in Wisconsin! We hope you all had a great 4th of July, and we know many of you haven’t made as many workouts as is routine this week so you will definitely want to read on to see what you missed during this week’s educational series!

Every day our workouts are a little bit different here at Ellipse Fitness, and we wanted to be sure that all of our members have some understanding of what we are aiming for with our workout programming. Here is our day-by-day look for this week:

(Monday)
Metabolic Conditioning in the broadest sense is a work:rest ratio implemented to elicit a specific response from the body. Different work to rest ratios call upon different energy systems of the body and help us work towards different goals (i.e sports performance, reducing body fat, increasing endurance). The key to getting the most out of “Met Con” is to push as hard as you can through the work period – “GO, GO, GO!” This increases your EPOC (excess post oxygen consumption) after your workout so you can continue to burn fat hours after your session is over!

(Tuesday)
Energy Systems: Ready? It’s about to get a little nerdy up in here…
Tuesday boxing combines cardio and strength. By combining both formats we can recruit all three energy systems (phosphagen, glycolytic and aerobic), boost metabolism, help prevent injury, and break the monotony of standard training protocol while still achieving significant results. The phosphagen system provides energy for all-out type exercises you can only do for 10 seconds or less, the glycolytic system is our intermediary system so to speak – for exercises lasting 30 seconds up to a few minutes minutes, and the aerobic system is utilized for those movements you can sustain longer.

(Wednesday)
HYPERTROPHY!! So much of what we design our workouts around revolves around muscle hypertrophy. In the simplest terms, this means “building muscle”. Hypertrophy includes both the ability to store more glycogen (stored glucose that is mobilized during the above-mentioned glycolytic cycle) and increase of myofibril size (the actual size and strength of the muscle fiber). We want to build more muscle for many reasons, not the least of which are an elevated metabolism and a less injury-prone body!

(Thursday)
High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) has been shown to offer greater benefits to your heart than moderate, steady-state workouts, and it is extremely effective for achieving fat loss, increasing endurance, decreasing blood glucose levels and promoting EPOC (Excess Post Oxygen Consumption). EPOC means your metabolism is elevated and you are burning calories/fat for hours following your workout. But there is a catch! During the peak times of the workout you have to push yourself to the limit to truly reap all the benefits of HIIT!

(Friday & Saturday)
Periodization may very well get its very own blog post dedicated to it in the future, because this here is a major piece of what separates a decent exercise routine from an exceptional one. We look at periodization on a day-to-day level, but also on a much broader scale with the understanding that many of our members are here for life! And while it is important to exercise throughout your life, if you just do the same movements the same way over and over and over and over and over…you get the idea…it will eventually lead to imbalance, chronic pain, boredom and most likely injury.

Periodization is a plan. Planned progressions to prevent plateaus. Planned management of fatigue to achieve continual muscular adaptations. Planned program design to avoid repetitive stress which can result in over-training and can set you back months or more.

Results at Ellipse Fitness come from our careful planning and management of your training program. To get the best results from your Ellipse program, arrive early to foam roll and warm up properly, understand the goal of the day’s workout, work to your full potential during the session, and then recover properly after you leave by eating well, getting enough sleep, and balancing stress. The program can’t work quite as well as it is designed if you don’t also do your part – and THAT is why we are stronger together, healthier together, and better together!

Fitness Tip: Kettlebell Single Arm Squat Push Press

Kettlebells were developed in Russia in the 1700s and are holistic in their nature in that they work several muscles simultaneously.

The Kettlebell Single Arm Squat Push-Press engages and strengthens the lower body, the core and the unilateral shoulder.

Start standing with your legs slightly wider than hip width apart and the kettlebell between your feet with the horn of the kettlebell horizontal.

Next hinge back at the hips and keep the back straight as you squat down to reach the kettlebell with your palm facing back.

To begin, dead clean the kettlebell from the ground straight up the center of the body to the chest in a rack position, keeping the upper arm next to the body, the wrist straight and the grip on the kettlebell relaxed.

Then squat down with the kettlebell locked into the shoulder and as you drive through the heels out of the squat, press the kettlebell overhead and finish with the palm facing forward.

Then bring the kettlebell back to the rack position at the chest and repeat your squat push-press.

Fitness Tip: Kettlebell Bottoms Up Reverse Lunge

Many sports such require overhead action such as throwing a ball, however many athletes struggle with the overhead postural stability that’s required to excel in their sport.

One of the most effective ways to train overhead postural stability is with an unstable overhead load such as the Kettlebell in the Bottoms Up Reverse Lunge.

1. Begin standing with feet hip width apart, holding the kettlebell by the horns in the bottoms up position.
2. Next straighten the elbows extending the arms overhead.
3. Once your arms and trunk are stabilized, alternate stepping back into a reverse lunge, pausing at the bottom before returning to your upright position.

To modify this move:
1. move to a stationary lunge
2. decrease the load

To intensify this move:
1. increase the pause time at the bottom of the lunge
2. simultaneously lunge while you overhead press the kettlebell
3. increase the load
4. move to a single arm position with the kettlebell

Fitness Tip: Kettlebell 2 Arm Swing

Kettlebells were developed in Russia in the 1700s and are holistic in their nature working several muscles simultaneously.

The two arm Kettlebell swing develops strength, endurance and coordination using mainly the glutes and hamstrings for power, while also engaging the quads, core, deltoids, low back, and lats for stabilization.

1. Start with the Kettlebell in front of the body and feet about hip width apart.

2. Grab the KB with 2 hands. With your chest up and back straight, hinge back at the hips, bending the knees and bring the Kettlebell between the legs and behind the body until the forearms are between the thighs.

3. Keeping the big toe pressed into the floor, drive the hips forward, and straighten the legs, propelling the Kettlebell forward to approximately shoulder height.

Fitness Tip: Step Back Lunge with Kettlebell Pass

Kettlebells were developed in Russia in the 1700s and are holistic in their nature working several muscles simultaneously.

The Step Back Lunge with Kettlebell Pass is a version of a weighted lunge.  However with the addition of the kettlebell we incorporate core stability into the move as the core engages to keep the body balanced while the kettlebell swings from side to side.

There are two versions to this move.

  1. One version is to step back in your alternating lunge first, and then bring the kettlebell directly down between the legs and under the bent knee to the outside of the body.
  2. The second and more core advanced version, is to bring the kettlebell wide  to the outside of your body, then under the bent knee side and up through the middle as you stand.

 

Fitness Tip of the Week: Kettlebell Figure 8 Wide Stance Squat

Are you looking for a move that will tone your inner thighs while tightening your booty as well?  Look no further than the Kettlebell Figure 8 Wide Stance Squat!

The wide stance position allows you to drop deeper in your squat with less pressure on your knees and lower back, and then engages and contracts the inner thighs and glute as you drive through your heels and return to a standing position.

In addition, by adding the kettlebell in a figure 8 movement between and around the outside of your legs, you will not only increase your aerobic output, but you’ll burn more calories, as well!  A win, win for low body toning and calorie burning!

 

 

Kettlebell: Triple Crush

If you’re looking for an effective move to tone up your arms (biceps and triceps) and your shoulders this holiday season, then the Kettlebell Triple Crush is for you!

Kettlebells were developed in Russia in the 1700s, and are holistic in their nature as they work several muscles simultaneously.

Begin by holding the base of the kettlebell with both hands with your arms down at your sides.  Then curl the kettlebell up to your chest.  Next, push the kettlebell up into an overhead press.  Finally, hinge at the elbows to bring the kettlebell behind your head (keeping upper arms close to you head).  Then reverse the order… extend the arms overhead, bring the kettlebell to your chest and then to the starting position.  Repeat.