footwear

The Home Workout Guide You Need!

More people than ever are working out at home whether via live-stream videos or Facetime, pre-recorded videos or just making things up as they go. But there are some things you’ll want to take into account to maximize your home workout efficacy – and safety!

1. Find Your Spot

Find a space with some room to move, good ventilation, and away from distractions. Are you watching a screen to follow along with your workout? Make sure you can see well enough by viewing on a computer screen, Smart TV, or other larger screened device. This is your time!

2. Find Your Time

Even during chaotic times, schedule your workout and don’t break your appointment! Let those around you know that you have an appointment you can’t miss whether in your home or otherwise. It is all too easy to skip a workout when you simply, “get around to it at some point”.

3. Be Prepared

You have your workout planned. Now make sure you are dressed and ready for your workout, have your water ready, and check-in. Check-in with your trainer, your friend, or whomever you are keeping accountability with. If you are self-motivated and can stay accountable with yourself, awesome, but many of us are not! Find your person! This is a really simple, REALLY effective tool.

4. Find Your Equipment

If you’ve always been a gym-person, you haven’t had to worry about at-home equipment. But what if you are temporarily at home or on the road?

Resistance bands and minibands are very cost effective. It is a great idea to have one for the “just in case” times. They can easily be tossed in luggage or in that drawer to not take up extra space.

– If you normally use some kind of assistance for your pushups, use a chair, a counter-top, a wall, or anything secure to elevate your pushup!

**Have Nothing? If you need some “make do” workout equipment, grab some of your reusable cotton tote bags or a duffel bag and fill your weight as needed. The bags can be held like a kettlebell for Turkish get ups, deadlifts, overhead presses, bicep curls, and so much more!
More ideas: canned foods, laundry detergent bottles, ½ and gallon milk jugs filled as needed can make great substitute weights. Get creative and/or ask for help! How to sub equipment, modify movements, etc. ask us!

5. Find Your Footwear

Although in many cases barefoot is the ideal way to train, if you have not worked out barefoot or in minimalist shoes previously, start slow! Use the same training shoes you have been and maybe try 10-minutes of your workout barefoot to see how you feel. This might be a great time to adjust to minimalist footwear, if it’s right for you.

What You Need to Know: Plantar Fasciitis

Today’s blog post is courtesy of a special guest writer and expert on the topic of Plantar Fasciitis: Rachel Zimmerman DPT.

If you’ve ever experienced pain in the bottom of your foot, or in your heel, chances are it’s Plantar Fasciitis.

There is a common misconception that this is something you have to live with, but you don’t! The following advice will help alleviate your pain and get you back on your feet.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

To understand what this condition is, we need to break it down into parts: plantar fascia and -itis. The plantar fascia is a structure in the bottom of the foot. It is a thin, white tissue similar to a ligament that sits between the skin and the muscle and extends from the heel to the toes. It provides stability to the foot. The suffix “-itis” is a Greek term meaning inflammation. So plantar fasciitis is inflammation of this tissue in the bottom of the foot.

What are the Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis typically presents as pain in the heel, usually on the inside part of the foot. The pain can also spread along the arch and along the bottom of the foot. The pain is usually worst during the first few steps after getting out of bed in the morning but can also occur after standing or walking for long periods of time.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis has multiple causes, but one of the most common is increasing your activity level too quickly! Also, having tight calf muscles, weak foot muscles, and/or wearing improper footwear.

What do I do if I believe I have plantar fasciitis?

Avoid aggravating activities: The most important thing you can do when you have an inflammatory condition is to avoid activities that increase your pain. Figure out which activities are aggravating it and modify them as you can. This does not mean to avoid activity altogether – just find activities you can do that don’t increase your pain level. This does not have to be long term, just while you are experiencing pain.

Stretch your calves: Tight calf muscles (the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles) can contribute to inflammation in the plantar fascia. Stretch your calves by sitting with your feet out in front of you with your knees straight, and place a towel around the ball of your foot. Pull back on the towel towards you until you feel a stretch in the calf. Hold for 30 seconds and then repeat a few times. You should feel a stretch, but not pain.

Strengthen your foot muscles: There are specific muscles in your foot that help to support your arch and take stress off the plantar fascia.

   • Great toe extension: Lift big toe, leaving other 4 on the ground. Repeat for 3 sets of 10.

   • Small toe extension: Lift 4 smaller toes, leaving big toe down. Repeat for 3 sets of 10.

   • Doming: Raise the arch of your foot, keeping toes down. Repeat for 3 sets of 10.

Change your footwear: Avoid shoes that are flat as these do not support your arch and can contribute to stress on the plantar fascia. Look for shoes that have a buildup on the inside of the shoe where your arch would be. Most shoe stores will be able to help find footwear that is appropriate for your feet, whether you need a stability shoe (which has more arch support than normal) or a neutral shoe (which has arch support but not as much as a stability shoe).

Ice: You can freeze a plastic water bottle, and then roll your bare foot over the frozen water bottle. It provides massage and ice, which will decrease the inflammation and will numb the pain temporarily. Do this for a few minutes at a time at most.

Consider orthotics: There are orthotics, or inserts for your shoe, that provide more stability for your arch. You can try basic orthotics from a drugstore or consider custom orthotics. A physical therapist, podiatrist, or orthotist can help you with custom orthotics.

**If your pain does not get better, consult a physical therapist! There are many other factors that contribute to plantar fasciitis that your physical therapist may be able to assess and treat.

This blog was specially written by our friend and guest writer Rachel Zimmerman, DPT.

Rachel is clinic director at ATI Physical Therapy right here in Green Bay, WI. You can find out more about her clinic or find a location near you at ATIpt.com!