Eggs

Feel Like a Spring Chicken With These Egg Recipes!

It’s the season of spring chickens and the celebration of Easter. Why eggs in spring? Because they symbolize new life! What better time than to talk eggs!

Eggs are a great source of protein, vitamins, and minerals. Eggs contain vitamins A, E, D, and B12 plus minerals like iron and folate. Egg yolks are one of the very few foods that naturally contain vitamin D!

Not All Eggs Are Created Equal!

The most commonly found eggs in the supermarket are grain-fed: a combination of corn and soybeans. Check your labels! “Free Range” would indicate a more natural diet of seeds, green plants, and insects, thus a lower omega-6 content (the fatty acid that most of us are already getting too much of).
Some eggs like Eggland’s Best feed chickens an omega-3 rich diets and thus transfer those healthy omega-3’s into their eggs and ultimately in our bellies. Omega-3 eggs have been seen to decrease blood glucose levels. If it’s in your budget, free-range and omega-3 diet fed chickens appear to be worth the investment!

What About The Yolks?

The yolks of eggs are often seen as “bad” because of cholesterol concerns. The yolk is actually where the good nutrients are stored, however! Eggs have not been found to be associated with any form of cardiovascular disease, despite their bad cholesterol rap. 75% of the cholesterol in our bodies is created by the liver. 25% comes from food. Studies have shown, even after eating 1 egg daily for a year, no adverse effects were found (except perhaps for people who are diabetic).

Does The Shell Color Matter?

So really, why are eggs different colors? To determine what color egg a chicken will lay, check out it’s earlobes! Seriously!

White feathered chickens with white earlobes will lay white eggs. Red or Brown chickens with red earlobes will lay brown eggs. Earlobes aside, the color of the egg really has no bearing on nutrition. Now, the YOLK color is dependent on the diet a hen was fed, a more pale yellow color indicating a weaker grain-fed diet versus a more golden yellow indicating a free range type diet.

Eat Eggs for Eye Health!

Treat your eyes with a healthy egg meal! Eggs contain lutein, which helps prevent macular degeneration and cataracts. Did you know that eggs age more in one day at room temperature than in one week in the refrigerator?

Consider adding more eggs into your meal routines. Afterall, they are the most commonly consumed animal product in the world!

Boost Your Protein!

Add some protein to your day with eggs! 2 egg whites contain 7g of protein. 1 full egg has 70 calories, 6g of protein (but also then contains the 1.5g saturated fat in the yolk).
DID YOU KNOW? Younger chickens lay eggs with harder shells. Now you know!

RECIPES

Check out these healthy, delicious egg recipes from our Ellipse Fitness Recipe Archives!

5 Ways to Boost Your Breakfast Protein for Better Results!

Breakfast.

Just the word brings about warm fuzzy feelings of coffee, toast, pancakes, potatoes, oatmeal, muffins, and more…carbohydrates.

You may be hard pressed to find someone who doesn’t find breakfast to be their favorite meal of the day, but there is often one major problem with breakfast – the lack of protein! (and veggies for that matter)

Work to get a protein source at breakfast as well as a vegetable, or least a fruit to pack some extra nutrients in your “most important meal of the day”! This helps to set you up for recovery from your workouts and ensures you are giving your body what it needs to reap the benefits of all the hard work you put in at the gym!

1. Start Simple!

Start easy by making a homemade parfait with plain Greek yogurt, fruit, seeds, and perhaps a dollop of local honey or maple syrup.

Greek Yogurt is a great protein source, but be aware of flavored yogurts!! You wouldn’t believe how much sugar they add into even “healthy” brands.

2. Add Eggs!

Eggs can be as simple as hard-boiled eggs (an Instant-Pot makes these super easy by the way!) or as fancy as a breakfast casserole (think leftovers for the week!). Check out this recipe for a breakfast casserole that combines spinach, bell peppers, onions, mushrooms, eggs, and hash browns for a nutrient packed and high protein breakfast!

3. Add Cottage Cheese!

Cottage cheese can be added to many dishes to add a protein kick, like shakes and baked goods. Especially for those who aren’t a big fan, adding to baked goods is quite good!

Have you tried our classic Ellipse Protein Pancakes with cottage cheese, oatmeal, and egg beaters as the main ingredients?

Or maybe even go as simple as serving cottage cheese and berries with some Kodiak Pancakes. If you haven’t found Kodiak cakes in the store yet, you’re missing out!

4. Add Protein Powder!

So many people count on that quick morning shake or smoothie. Try adding a scoop of protein powder (and even consider a greens powder) to give your breakfast a major nutrition boost!

See the cottage cheese suggestion above as well, because it makes a great add-in to shakes as well to thicken them up and add protein.

5. Add quinoa!

Quinoa? That’s right! Quinoa has 8g of protein per cup – the highest of any grain – and it’s a vegan/vegetarian source of protein!

Try this Cinnamon Toast Breakfast Quinoa with cinnamon, pecans, and maple syrup! YUM!!

Or try this Sweet Quinoa Breakfast Bowl!

Break The Fast with Protein

Choose breakfast consciously instead of mindlessly grabbing the same thing each morning! Plan it like any other meal throughout the day.

Try adding some beans to your breakfast burrito or it could be as simple as adding some vanilla protein powder to your coffee in place of creamer (TIP: make sure to cool a small cup of coffee to mix the powder in first so it doesn’t clump from too high of heat. then add the rest after it’s been emulsified).

What to Eat, When to Eat, and What it Means for Your Workouts

Thankfully, it seems the era of fad-diets, fat-free, no-carb or other diets that entirely slash a whole category of macronutrients is coming to a close! But with that said, it is still difficult to find reliable information on proper nutrition! Let’s take a look at how eating factors into the effectiveness of your workouts, and maybe we can make sense of some of this.

“What should I eat before/after my workout?”

For most of us who exercise for health and not training for a high-level competition, our meals will contain some combination of high quality protein, high quality carbohydrates, healthy fats, and some fruit and vegetables 1-2 hours before and/or after your workout to get the maximal benefit. Whether it is “and” vs “or” will partly depend on the intensity/duration of your activity, daily caloric intake and what is on the menu for the rest of your day

Break it down for me: What’s important – and Why?

Protein can help maintain muscle size, reduce muscle damage, provide your bloodstream with amino acids when it needs them most, and helps you adapt to your exercise over the long term! But most people are at least somewhat aware of the importance of protein for strength training – what about carbohydrates?

Pre-Exercise carbs fuel your workout and help with recovery/muscle retention with even shorter, intense workouts. Post-exercise carbs however should come from whole foods like fruits and vegetables because these are better tolerated by the system than insulin-spiking refined carbohydrates and are just as good at restoring muscle glycogen over 24 hours.

Alright…but tell me more about “When”.

If you ate a normal-sized, balanced meal a couple of hours before training (or a smaller shake closer to training), then you have 1-2 hrs after training to eat your post-workout meal and still maximize the benefits of workout nutrition.

But if you are like many who work out early in the morning or directly after leaving work, and you ate only a small meal within the last 3-4 hours before your workout, or you are in a fasted state, then you should consume a meal within one hour after your workout to prevent a slowed recovery. A whole food meal pre/post workout provides many things including important phytonutrients that build muscle, supply energy, decrease inflammation, and boost recovery.

Ya know, it just isn’t the same for me!

You might be right! In the end, the total amount of protein and carbohydrate consumed over the course of the day is far more important to lean mass gain, fat loss, and performance improvements than any specific nutrient timing strategy. If you are a high-quality eater (you are only looking to tweak minor things) check out this infographic that further breaks down your meals by body type!

When in doubt, keep it simple and fill each nutrient slot:
Protein – Scrambled Eggs with veggies
Fat – 1 “thumb” of cheese
Carb – 1 slice of Ezekial toast or fruit

Now we’ve got some recipes to help make finding a well-balanced, complete meal a little easier for you!

Asian Scrambled Eggs:

Shake up your eggs with a few new elements like some incredibly healthy ginger root and nutritious snow peas!
Check the recipe here!

Classic Protein Pancakes:

Rolled oats, eggs, cottage cheese, fruit – these pancakes have everything you need to call them a complete meal!

Find this recipe and more on our previous blog post here!

PB & Chocolate Banana Shake:

1 scoop choc protein powder, 1 fistful of spinach, 1 banana, 1 “thumb” of peanut butter, and 8 oz choc unsweetened almond milk. Blend and enjoy!

Need even more ideas? How about Banana Cream Pie Oatmeal?? Peaches and Cream Omelet?? You can find those and MORE in Precision Nutrition’s Gourmet Recipes List!