DIY

Boost Winter Nutrition with Sprouts and Microgreens!

It’s winter and it feels like it can be harder to get more nutrient dense foods like lush greens from the garden and ripe tomatoes from the vine. Try bringing the simplest of gardens indoors!

You can grow microgreens and sprout your own seeds and grains to add a major boost of vitamins and minerals to your meals.

Microgreens

Do you eat microgreens? No matter what the season, microgreens can be grown near a sunny window year-round!

Microgreens are harvested after the first set of true leaves have sprouted in 1-3 weeks. Snow pea shoots, red beets, purple and green basil, pak choi, cilantro, parsley and mesclun mix germinate and grow to microgreen size in about two weeks.

Add microgreens into your next salad, sandwich, stir-fry or just eat by themselves! Check out this DIY video tutorial here!

Sprouts

Differing from microgreens, sprouts are harvested within just a couple days of breaking away from the seed or legume. Plants grown specifically for their sprouts are grown in water and either dark or partial light.

Grow your own sprouts at home with a mason jar and cheesecloth or to make getting started easier, you can purchase a special sprouting container that has a screen/sieve built into the cover and sits on an angle to drain water best.

Why So Expensive?

Well first off, the cost comes way down when you do it yourself! But long story short: Just think, a seed can produce a full plant or it can produce one sprout. Microgreens and sprouts have a higher cost due to the number of seeds it requires to create your end-product. Have extra garden seeds left over? Throw them in a pot with soil, densely, and create your own microgreens at home!

Sprouted Grain Bread

I eat sprouts…is that the same thing that is in sprouted grain bread?

Basically, yes. Most sprouts are from pulses/beans where most breads are made from whole grain seeds that are just starting to sprout, called sprouted grains. Seeds are living things! When sprouted, they are easily digestible since their starch is broken down, having a minimal effect on blood sugar and contain more protein, vitamin c, folate, fiber and B vitamins, and essential amino acids than their non-sprouted counterparts. Some people with allergenic tendency towards grains find less sensitivity to sprouted grains since they have less starch.

Note: Generally, sprouted grain foods should be refrigerated to avoid bacteria that can grow on them (think warm, moist environment for sprouting to occur). Therefore, the truest “sprouted grain” products will be found in the refrigerated or frozen section. One of the cleanest and well-known breads in the frozen section are the Ezekiel brand products that come in bread, buns, and wraps. Slightly more processed versions, that are also then less dense, that are not in the frozen section would be Dave’s Killer Bread – Sprouted and Angelic Bakehouse products.

Cut Down on Harsh Chemical Use and Waste with Castile Soap

Castile soap is an olive oil based hard soap made with pure, all natural/organic, chemical-free plant based ingredients that is also biodegradable AND doesn’t expire. The most common brand you’ll find is Dr. Bronner’s castile soap made both as original and with numerous scents from various essential oils. Castile soap can make at home kitchen, bath, and body products! Use it as a dish soap with just a few drops! You can find it at most big-box stores or natural foods stores, and all of our recipes below use it in dilution which means not only are they good ways to cut down the use of chemicals in your home and waste products in the garbage can, but it will save you MONEY!

Why should I make my own cleaning products?

The EPA indicates artificial fragrances in cleaning products as an indoor irritant and pollutant. Why? A single fragrance (simply labeled “fragrance” on the ingredient list) can include as many as 600 petrochemicals! (Petrochemical = chemicals derived from petroleum. Probably not what you want to inhale, put on your skin, etc.)

DIY Pine Sol Substitute

Throw the following in a spray bottle:

– 32 oz warm water
– 1.5 tsp castile soap
– 6 drops fir needle essential oil
– 4 drops rosemary essential oil

Simple Shampoo

– 1/4 cup coconut milk
– 1/4 cup castile soap
– 20 drops essential oil of choice (optional)
*If you have really dry hair consider adding a few drops of olive oil or almond oil*

Seal in a jar, or use an old pump soap bottle. If it is a foaming dispenser add 1/4 cup distilled water.

https://wellnessmama.com/3701/homemade-shampoo/

Natural Wet Wipes

– 1 cup warm water
– 1/8 cup castile soap
– 5-10 drops of an essential oil (optional)

Combine in a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid (another canning jar opportunity!). Cut squares from a plain cotton T-Shirt and submerge in the jar with the liquid and flip the jar upside down until all is soaked. After use, wash the cloth out in the sink and return to the jar to reuse.

DIY Laundry Detergent

– 1 cup castile soap
– 3/4 cup baking soda
– 1/4 cup fine sea salt

Dissolve baking soda and sea salt in 2 cups warm water, then add all ingredients to a one-gallon container and fill with water. Use 1/4 cup per load of laundry. This makes enough for 60 loads of laundry! Talk about saving money!

Mop Water

So easy! Just add 2-3 TBSP of castile soap to your bucket of water and clean your floors naturally!

Body Wash/Hand Soap

Even easier! For body wash just slightly dilute your castile soap with a little water (2:1 ratio soap:water).

Love your foamy hand soap? Refill a foam dispenser with a 1:4 ratio of soap:water and you won’t even notice the difference!

Still using traditional products? Learn more about them at www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Want to know even more ways to use castile soap? Find more recipes here!