diet

Is it Keto Fever or Keto Flu?

A few weeks ago, we talked about IF (Intermittent Fasting). The Keto Diet (AKA Ketogenic Diet) is another way of eating that has been around for a while now, though more recently it is starting to become a bit of a craze.

Keto refers to a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet, which forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates as the primary fuel source. A ketogenic diet is/was primarily implemented to treat difficult-to-control epilepsy in children. It was first tested at a Mayo Clinic in the 1920s.

A keto meal may look something like this:

Typical keto-friendly food choices are things like seafood, low-carb vegetables (non-starchy), cheese, avocados, beef, poultry, eggs, coconut oil, olive oil, plain Greek yogurt, cottage cheese (other dairy typically has too many carbs), nuts/seeds, butter, olives, and black coffee/tea.

How does Keto vary from other ways of eating?

Keto

60-75% Fat

15-30% Protein

5-10% Carbs

Mediterranean

~35% Fat

~25% Protein

~50% Carbs

Paleo

~40% Fat

~40% Protein

~20% Carbs

The Ketogenic Diet is about trying to get into ketosis

It can take anywhere from 2-7 days for the body to enter ketosis depending on the person. This happens when the body doesn’t have enough carbohydrates for energy and uses up the glucose storage. During ketosis, the body starts making ketones, which happens through the oxidation/burning of stored fat.

I want to try the Keto Diet. What can I expect?

With any major diet change, there is generally an adjustment period for the body, however it does seem that this transition is a little more severe with Keto than many diets. During the first week you may experience IBS like symptoms and tiredness. The lack of quick energy from carbohydrates causes the tiredness and has been coined the “keto flu”. Other symptoms can include lightheadedness, nausea, mental fog, cramps, headaches, bad breath and diarrhea. Some of this may be due to reduced fiber and insufficient micronutrients, so it’s important to be aware that you’re doing what you can to fill those gaps.

On the plus side, people often find they can lose weight because healthy fats and lean proteins will keep you more satiated, so eating less is a natural side effect. Also, fats and protein have a higher thermic effect meaning it takes your body more energy/calories just to break the food down.

That sounds like a lot of symptoms, is it worth it?

Frankly, people do often report success. Many see results on the scale rather quickly because when you eat more carbs your body retains fluid. This is one reason why weight comes off quickly with keto initially. Results can continue for a while, but it should be noted that in the vast majority cases people report not being able to stick with it long term.

What else should I know?

Unfortunately, and similar to the “eat less and exercise more” mentality, muscle loss often accompanies the relatively quick weight loss. This can be misleading if the scale is your only source of measurement. Make sure to check with your doctor before beginning any nutrition regimen, but in particular with keto, heart and kidney damage has been observed due to low electrolyte levels (sodium, magnesium, potassium). Keto is not recommended for those with high blood pressure or diabetes. Keto can cause more calcium to be lost in the urine, which can lead to a decrease in bone density over time and increased risk of osteoporosis.

The summary: As with any way of eating, everyone is different, and results will vary depending on your body. This short-term fix may be right for some, but not everyone.

Ellipse Fitness does not endorse the Ketogenic Diet, nor do we view it as a sustainable approach to nutrition, check out these other great blog articles for more of our philosophy on how to make changes that will last you a lifetime!

Ellipse Fitness “Nutrition” Blog Posts

Free Radicals, Your Health and How to Manage!

Free Radicals

Straight from Miriam Webster: an especially reactive atom or group of atoms that has one or more unpaired electrons; especially : one that is produced in the body by natural biological processes or introduced from an outside source (such as tobacco smoke, toxins, or pollutants) and that can damage cells, proteins, and DNA by altering their chemical structure.

BORING…

But the important words are ESPECIALLY REACTIVE. Free radicals are desperately seeking out an electron pair – and the WILL get it one way or another. So how do we handle free radicals in our body, and where do they come from?

Free radicals are the main reason behind the recommendations for increasing foods rich in antioxidants such as blackberries, blueberries, goji, etc. in your daily diet. These foods essentially pick up high numbers of free radicals from your body when being digested, but that’s not the only way!

To quote Dr. Carol Davis (Professor Emerita – University of Miami Miller School of Medicine): “Over time, free radicals build up in our bodies. In order for them to become stable, the radicals must find an electron to “connect” themselves to. Where are these electrons then? Beyond the sources found in certain foods, vitamins, etc, we have an abundant source of electrons right beneath us in the earth. If we fail to connect ourselves with these sources, free radicals attack our healthy tissue to rob the cells of their electrons. The result? A high potential for infection and inflammation, among other ailments.”

Earthing?

From a scientific perspective, the idea is that the earth has a mild negative charge to it. Over time, especially in modern life, our bodies build up a positive charge. Direct contact with the earth can even out this positive charge and return the body to a neutral state.

Many people don’t have this contact with the earth anymore, and some experts wonder if this is a contributor to the many rising health problems we face today. As a population, we wear rubber shoes and live indoors. In theory, many of us could go years without directly touching the earth at all, or even being in direct sunlight!

Antioxidants

Vitamin E and Vitamin C are great antioxidant sources, and can be found in high quantities in foods like nuts, seeds, fish oils (vitamin E), citrus, kale, strawberries, green peppers, etc (vitamin C).

Antioxidants are the polar opposite of free radicals and are especially adept at neutralizing these otherwise harmful byproducts.

Where do they come from?

While not much is known for sure about free radicals’ effects on the body, scientists have theorized that they may contribute to everything from wrinkles/aging signs to atherosclerosis to Alzheimer’s Disease!

While free radicals do occur due to natural body processes, high levels of free radicals are generally associated with people living in highly polluted areas, people who eat fried foods and/or trans fats, people who smoke cigarettes, or people exposed to pesticides.

Interesting Fact: “Weekend Warriors” (as opposed to people who exercise consistently) generate far more free radicals during endurance exercise. Consider a more consistent approach to conditioning which allows your body to manage the stress and not become overwhelmed by the unusual strain.

Stir Fry: Quick and Easy Healthy Cooking!

Stir Fry is a Chinese technique of cooking in a small amount of oil, over high heat, in a bowl-shaped pan (wok) while being stirred. Stir fry can be a great component of healthy eating since it usually contains lots of veggies and lean protein. The stir fry technique allows veggies to retain their color, crunch, and most importantly nutrients!

Step 1: Choose Your Protein, Seasonings and Veggies

This is the foundation of all stir fry, and a fantastic base for healthy eating! Below you’ll see we’ve got beef, chicken, and even veggie stir fry with chickpeas and snow peas for a protein boost!

Step 2: Prep Your Ingredients

Any given recipe uses about a pound of protein, 1 tablespoon of aromatics, and 4 cups of vegetables. Stir fry comes together quickly, so you need all of your ingredients chopped and ready to go before you begin cooking.
TIP: Consider buying pre-chopped onions, matchstick carrots, etc if you are strapped for time!

Step 3: Make Your Sauce

Sauce…maybe the biggest factor between eating and dining! A basic stir fry sauce would include garlic, soy sauce, rice vinegar, brown sugar/honey, stock/water, and cornstarch. Get creative! Just make your own whenever possible because pre-packaged sauce often comes with unsavory ingredients.
TIP: Cook up a huge batch of brown rice when you have extra time and freeze it in storage bags. If you whip together a last minute stir-fry, pull out of the freezer, cut open the bag and microwave covered for about 5 minutes.

Step 4: Time to Stir Fry

Cook your protein for a few minutes alone until browned and set aside (does not have to be cooked through). Add oil, aromatics, then veggies until cooked, but crunchy. Recombine, add sauce and simmer a few minutes. Voila!
TIP: Aromatics are ingredients like garlic, green onions, shallots, ginger that are heated in some sort of fat/oil to release the flavor, cook these by themselves in the oil for 30 seconds to a minute, being careful not to burn them before adding the veggies.

Step 5: Serve and Enjoy!

Add a little culinary flare to your dish with garnishes such as cilantro, green onions, or sesame seeds for flavor and presentation. Enjoy a speedy, flavor packed meal!

Why a Wok??

The shape of the pan and constantly stirring helps make sure things aren’t over-cooked so veggies can retain their crunch and the aromatics don’t burn! When it’s time to add the sauce, push the contents to the side of the pan so they stop cooking on the most intense heat, and pour your sauce in the middle until thickens/boils before mixing it all together!

Recipes for Starters!

There’s No Way You Knew These Things About Berries!

Berry picking season is here! Whether you pick your own berries, get them through a CSA or local market consider adding them to your next meal plan! Berries are loaded with antioxidants, fiber, and immune-boosting vitamin C. This week we are going to deliver the facts on nature’s candy, and spruce up some old Ellipse Classic Recipes!

Let’s start by adding any and all types of berries to our Ellipse Protein Pancakes recipe! Just a few ingredients and they pack a serious nutritional punch!

Strawberries

Strawberries taste best at room temperature, but they are also one of the most perishable! What a paradox…
As soon as you get your berries consume the ones with bruises, they are the ripest. Compost any that show signs of mold. Wash your berries only once you’re ready to eat them. If your berries were commercially produced and may have pesticides on them, soak in a container of water with 1 tsp of baking soda for about 15 minutes before using. Berries will stay best when stored in a single layer, so it might be worth taking them out of the container you generally find them in.

Fun Facts!
• Because of their natural level of nitrate, strawberries have been shown to increase endurance for a workout!
• Strawberries are the only fruit that wear their seeds on the outside! Although that fact means that by technicality strawberries aren’t even a fruit since fruits have their seeds on the inside, like blueberries. Strawberries are part of the rose family. Are you starting to feel like you don’t really know your fruits at all??

Try strawberries by making your own yummy Yogurt Bark!

Blueberries

Blueberries make a great frozen snack right out of the freezer! Freeze your berries by washing, patting dry, and freezing on a cookie sheet in a single layer before moving to a bag or container to freeze for up to a year.

Fun Facts!
• Blueberries can be used as a natural food dye. It’s thought that back in colonial times, colonists boiled blueberries with milk to create grey paint.
• Blueberries are only 1 of 3 fruits native to North America! (Cranberries, Blueberries and Concord Grapes)

Pair blueberries or other types of berries with nectarines and almonds in this delicious and healthy Couscous Fruit Salad!

Raspberries

Raspberries are known as an aggregate fruit, creating bead-like pockets called a drupelets from multiple ovaries (Yes, plants have ovaries). Based on how it grows, each drupelet could be considered a fruit on it its own! Unlike many fruits, unripe raspberries do not ripen after they have been picked. Once it’s picked, that’s that.

Fun Facts!
• One raspberry has approximately 100-120 druplets, meaning EACH raspberry has 100-120 seeds! Got a toothpick?
• Raspberries don’t just come in red, but can be purple, gold or black in colour! The gold ones are the sweetest variety, and very tasty.

Raspberries are a no-brainer addition to so many recipes, but start by mixing them into some Banana “Nice” Cream!

Blackberries

Blackberries, like raspberries, are an aggregate fruit. But unlike raspberries, they are produced from one ovary. With that difference, when you pick a blackberry the center stays intact, unlike a raspberry.

Fun Facts!
• Blackberries were used to treat gout by the ancient Greeks because of their anti-inflammatory properties!
• blackberries are known by a variety of names including brambleberries, dewberries, and thimbleberries.

Add blackberries in to our classic Ellipse Breakfast Muffins!

Fast Facts: Intermittent Fasting

We receive quite a few questions on intermittent fasting. It’s certainly a buzz word today. Well start by saying intermittent fasting has a place in the nutrition and health world and can be right for some people, but before starting any trendy protocol, make sure to start by cleaning up your daily habits. Tossing out the processed foods, limiting sugar and flour intake, and getting back to the basics of vegetables, protein, fruit, and a little bit of healthy fats. For many, simple changes that are CONSISTENT are all that is needed. It’s amazing what can happen when we take these simple steps. Want to know more about eating simple? Try SSSimple Eating: Shake, Salad, Starch basics.

If you feel your portions and quality of food are on par, listen up as we talk more about intermittent fasting, and maybe it could help you break through a plateau.

What is Intermittent fasting?

In its simplest form, intermittent fasting is setting aside a chunk of hours in a day where you fast and a chunk of hours for “feasting”. The most common protocol is a 16/8. This means you fast for 16 hours and eat within a specific 8-hour window like 10 am – 6 pm for instance. This would essentially be skipping what most call breakfast, and cutting out after-dinner snacking. If you have followed the Ellipse Shake, Salad, Starch program, you’ll see that you “ride the fast” and then your first meal of the day is breakfast, whatever time that may be.

Another common format is to satisfy all of your daily nutritional needs in one sitting, essentially taking 24 hours off between feasts. As you can see, when it comes to intermittent fasting, finding a protocol of fasting vs feasting that works best for your body is key. If you choose to go this route, play around with different time frames and fast periods to see how your body responds. Be aware of your energy levels throughout the day and pay attention to signs of fatigue as there is no “one-size-fits-all” method. No matter your fast type, be sure to stay hydrated during fast time!

Why choose intermittent fasting?

Intermittent fasting doesn’t necessarily tell you WHAT foods to eat, just when, which can make it a straightforward, easy to follow plan. Intermittent fasting can help teach your body to use the food it consumes more efficiently. Your body can learn to burn fat as fuel when you deprive it of constant grazing/calories. And of course because you are restricting the time intervals that you eat, over the course of a week most people naturally eat less calories which is part of the reason this method has worked for many.

This method can make your life simpler by having fewer meals to plan for. Some research has been done on animals regarding intermittent fasting but long-term data is not yet available. Our friends at Precision Nutrition do not recommend intermittent fasting for pregnant women, people with disordered eating, chronically stressed people, people who doesn’t sleep well, or someone new to diet and exercise.

In Closing…

Like any way of eating, intermittent fasting can be effective for some, but no process works the same for everyone due to all of our unique bodies, lifestyles, and more. What is important is finding the system that works for you to improve health, performance, and happiness!

Now we know we mentioned it already, but if you struggle with maintaining healthy eating habits you’ve got to check out our new SSSimple Eating guide!

This 58-page guide will show you, step-by-step, how to reach YOUR goals using YOUR preferences, and following YOUR rules without expensive, unrealistic meal plans or fad diets!

Omega 3 vs. Omega 6 – What’s the deal?

Omega Fatty Acids:

We often hear about the benefits of Omega-3’s through fish oil, flax/chia/hemp seeds, walnuts and more. But why? Both Omega-3 and Omega-6 are essential fats meaning our bodies cannot create them and we must consume them through food (or supplements). Our bodies use these fats to create other fats that have crucial functions in the body. However it is the ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 Fatty Acids consumed that nutrition experts are most concerned about.

What is the proper ratio?

For quite some time, it was suggested we ate a ratio of 1:1 (Omega-6: Omega-3). However in today’s world where a sizeable proportion of calories are derived from processed foods rich in vegetable oils and animal-derived fats (namely grain-fed cattle) the ratio has shifted for most people to consuming 10-15:1! This all has created the need to move closer to the 1:1 by increasing Omega-3 consumption and reducing Omega-6 consumption to reduce arthritis inflammation, lower cardiac risk, and reduce brain inflammation (ie Alzheimer’s, mental illness).

In general, most organizations suggest around 500 mg/day of EPA/DHA, however The Institute of Medicine has gone a step further and encourages a daily intake of 1.6 g and 1.1 g per day for adult males and females, respectively.

What foods are rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids?

First, it’s important to know that there are three main types:

ALA (alpha-linolenic acid)

EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid)

DHA (docosahexaenoic acid)

The first one – ALA – is found in many commonly consumed foods that also have Omega-6 Fatty Acids, hence there is less of a push for people to up their intake of ALA. Some foods with the highest ratio of Omega-3 to Omega-6 are fish and seafood, followed by beans (mung beans/black lentils), Peppermint and Spearmint herbs, green vegetables, tropical fruits, seeds, and mixed green salad.

The only true food source rich in DHA/EPA is fatty fish such as wild-caught salmon. If you are vegan, or do not consume fatty fish or fish oil, you may need to consider using an algal oil (or perilla oil) supplement. Current and limited research shows it could produce a similar effect to marine oils.

*It’s worth noting that current ocean pollution raises possible concerns regarding the safety of fish in general.

OMEGA FATTY ACID SIDE NOTES: You can still have too much of a good thing. While generally not problematic, excessive consumption of fish oil can increase your risk of bleeding and may suppress your immune response. If you take fish oil supplements, be sure to follow your doctor’s recommendation on dosage. Also double-check with your doctor, before taking a fish oil supplement, if you are on blood pressure medication as it has been shown to reduce blood pressure.

Now check out this list of Omega-3 rich foods to add to your shopping list!

Keep it simple with grilled salmon over veggies or try out this delicious recipe with arugula and veggie salad!

Osteoporosis and Osteopenia: What You Need to Know

Bone density is a measure of how strong and durable your bones are. Osteopenia is diagnosed when density levels drop, but aren’t quite low enough for an osteoporosis diagnosis. Bones naturally weaken with age as bone cells become reabsorbed into the body quicker than they are reproduced causing them to become weaker and more likely to break during normal everyday activity.

Why Are Women More Susceptible?

About HALF of Americans over the age of 50 get osteopenia! However, women tend to develop osteopenia/porosis much more often than men due to lower peak bone densities and the hormonal effects of menopause. Peak bone density occurs around the age of 30-35 and then begins to decline thereafter. So, young folks out there: try to do whatever you can to attain the highest possible bone density by age 30 to help prevent the natural decline as you age!

Am I at Risk?

Risk factors include, but are not limited to:
• diet low in calcium/vitamin D
• smoking
• inactivity
• regularly drinking colas
• family history
• heavy drinking
• removal of ovaries before menopause.
• chemotherapy
• steroid usage
• metabolic disorders
• GENETICS! Approximately 50-85% of bone mass density is genetic, so take heed if your mother or father suffered from osteoporosis.

Lifestyle changes can stop and/or reduce the progression of osteopenia/osteoporosis. Although some cases may require medication, there are many ways to stop or reduce the progression of bone density loss!

What Can You Do?

Exercise!

But unfortunately not just any exercise counts. Weight-bearing activity is critical, so things like swimming, cycling, etc while they have their own benefits with regards to osteoporosis resistance training is number 1.

Strength training helps prevent osteopenia/osteoporosis by adding stress to the bone causing it to grow stronger and denser – it is basically that simple. Ask your bones to handle higher load and they will respond by building themselves stronger!

Weight bearing is key, but jumping has higher force than jogging so jumping triggers more bone growth for instance, so plyometric movements are particularly effective for improving bone density!
*It’s important to note that for someone currently diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis you should consult your physician before engaging in high intensity exercise given the risks*

Get a Little Sunshine!

About 50% of people worldwide are low in vitamin D due to a combination of living in places with very little sun in the winter along with concerns around skin cancer many have avoided any sun exposure without sunscreen. Merely 10 or 15 minutes a day is enough for significant vitamin D levels!

Sources

The Devil in the Details…Sugar!

Sugar inside the body – blood sugar – is a sticky substance that coats the red blood cells. If left in the bloodstream (instead of being burned as energy) the particles will start to stick to the cells, interfering with blood circulation and oxygen exchange! Research has even shown that white blood cells are less efficient at fighting illness when exposed to sugar. Be careful of added sugars in your diet, especially if you feel an illness coming on!

One thing to think about here is the difference between complex carbohydrates and simple carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates come from vegetables and whole grain sources and break down more slowly, releasing glucose into the bloodstream more steadily instead of creating a spike in blood sugar. Read more about glycemic index here at nih.gov

WARNING: Sugars Hiding On The Label!

Did you know there are 56 different names for sugar?? Watch your labels and look for sneaky sugar words like dextrose, sucrose, sorbitol, rice syrup, and so many more! Read the full list here!

You also have to be aware of “healthy” sounding sugars like Agave. Agave is made by treating agave plant sugars with heat and enzymes which leads to a highly refined end product still heavily loaded with calories and still…sugar! Even raw, unfiltered, organic, locally produced honey which certainly has some positive properties and benefits is still ultimately sugar – so stay sharp if fat loss is your goal!

Added Sugars can lead to Excess Weight. Why? Sugar in the blood that goes unused completely ends up being stored as fat. Too much fat in the body can lead to obesity, and obesity is known to trigger diabetes and heart disease, among other common diseases.

Diabetes is not directly caused by too much added sugar but excess weight raises the risk for diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, added sugar can make it worse since your body becomes less efficient at regulating blood sugar (glucose) due to spikes and drops in insulin. Worse yet due to the disrupted blood circulation, diabetes can cause high blood pressure and ultimately heart attack, stroke, eye conditions, nerve damage, and kidney damage.

When we eat too much sugar, the process called glycation can occur. When this happens, some of the sugar we consume sticks to the proteins in our body, causing our body tissues to lose their elasticity. It is not just our skin that is affected, but also our internal organs. The faster that the body loses its elasticity, the faster aging occurs!

Refined carbohydrates such as white bread and other white flour products tend to be very high in sugar and will cause an inflammation of the skin. Additionally, when we eat too much sugar, the process called glycation can occur. When this happens some of the sugar we consume sticks to the proteins in our body, causing our body tissues to lose their elasticity. It is not just our skin that is affected, but also our internal organs. The faster that the body loses its elasticity, the faster aging occurs! Skip the added sugar and age gracefully!

Rock Thanksgiving With These Drinks and Apps!

Well Thanksgiving is nearly here, and if yours is anything like most friends and family will descend upon an agreed upon location, all hauling heavy, over-the-top dishes that almost universally contain extra sweetness and a higher-than-usual volume of carbohydrates!

It’s a celebration meal designed for giving thanks, but instead we often find ourselves crying, “uncle!” at the hands of a feast low in quality nutrition and very high in sugar and calories. Either that, or you find yourself getting inquisitive stares from across the table as they notice your plate isn’t piled high enough to block your view!

BUT NOT THIS YEAR WE SAY! Start planning now to freshen up the variety and the quality of the meal, and most at the table will probably thank you for it!

Appetizers!

Time to get your appetizer vocabulary up to speed! Crudites (kroo-dee-tay) is a French word that means a vegetable that can be cut into sticks, thin slices, or bite size pieces and served with a cold dip. Try this easy, healthy, avocado hummus dip! Blend 2 avocados, 1 can drained chickpeas, ¼ c lemon juice and olive oil, and 1.5 TBSP tahini (optional). Salt/Pepper to taste.

Prep double the veggies and double down on another dip with this excellent version of spinach dip! No Mayo, no cream cheese or sour cream!

Check out the recipe here!

Baked Blooming Onion! Who can resist snagging a piece of a blooming onion?? Try a healthier version by baking and plating with a greek yogurt based dip. Cut the base off an onion, cutting into 12-16 sections (not cutting all the way through) and “flower” the petals, dredge in 2 egg white wash, and coat with ¼ c panko + ¼ c ground almonds + 1/8 c parmesan and spices. Bake 40-45 minutes at 375.
Find the recipe here!

Want a dip with a kick? Combine 8oz plain greek yogurt + 1 tsp sriracha sauce + 1 tbsp parsley.

Drinks!

Add 1 shot of vodka over ice, mix 16 oz water with an “on-the-go” packet of Crystal Light or Similar powder. Pour half the mix over the vodka/ice and add a splash of lemon-lime or ginger ale soda. Toss in a blender for a blended drink! Get creative with your favorite flavors. Only about 110 calories: Cheers!

Combine a packet of Swiss Miss 25 Calorie hot chocolate mix, 3/4 Cup Hot Water and 1 Peppermint Stick. Ready to kick back with something a little more? Add a quick shot of vodka, but keep in mind that will set you back an additional 100 calories. You decide what it’s worth!

Leftovers!

Are you hosting Thanksgiving? This year, buy a BIGGER turkey and rock those leftovers (or snag unwanted leftovers from the host)! Check out these great Ellipse Fitness recipes to use that leftover turkey!

Turkey Enchiladas

Turkey Tortilla Soup

Diet Myth-Busting!

This week we are busting diet myths! First up, it’s…

EAT LESS, WEIGH LESS.”

While that CAN be true in some cases, usually people don’t want to lose weight – they want to lose fat! So, if you are comfortable depriving your body the nutrients it needs, feeling hungry all the time, and losing muscle, water and bone density – then this is the diet for you! In order to maintain muscle and proper body functioning (especially for people involved in strength training several times a week like our Ellipse members!) you need to eat at least a certain number of calories in the proper ratio of protein, fat and carbohydrates.
Now of course if an average person was eating 3,000 calories a day sure, cutting their calorie intake a little will probably help them lose some weight. For most of us however, when we “diet” we tend to cut out entire macronutrient categories (*cough cough* carbohydrates), and slash caloric intake below a baseline level needed to ensure your body doesn’t enter “starvation mode”.

LOW-FAT, LOW-CARB, SUGAR-FREE, DIET, LITE”

These are marketing terms dreamed up in a corporate office to sell cheap (in quality and ingredients, not always in price) products to the incredibly large market of people desperate to lose weight. We’ve discussed the downside to artificial sweeteners in the past, but products with these labels tend to be highly processed, and are often just junk food disguised as a guilt-free indulgence – however, they are anything but. Low or Fat-Free products often have added sugar to make it taste good enough to eat (see the classic example of fat-free frozen yogurt)

EAT SMALLER AMOUNTS FREQUENTLY TO BOOST METABOLISM.”

The truth is the number one way to boost your metabolism is by increasing the amount of muscle you have – that’s about it. Constant digestion has a negligible effect on your metabolism and might even do more harm than good for your teeth and intestines. Eating a healthy snack (think: Veggies and Hummus, Fruit and Greek Yogurt or Peanut Butter, etc) between meals however can help you to stay more satisfied during the day and prevent overeating at meal time.

EATING PROTEIN AND CARBS SEPARATELY AIDS IN WEIGHT LOSS.”

This one is patently UN-true because in fact the best way to ensure efficient digestion of protein is to pair it with a high-fiber carbohydrate. Many of the healthiest protein options come pre-paired with carbohydrates already like beans, nuts, seeds etc.

EATING FAT MAKES YOU FAT!”

This one is very important because many people striving for a healthy diet almost totally abstain from dietary fat, which is to their detriment because many vitamins (A, D, E and K) REQUIRE fat to be absorbed into the body. Also adding small amounts of healthy fat (EVOO, Coconut Oil, etc) to vegetables makes most people much more likely to eat them, and help you feel full! (Think: apple = still hungry vs. apple + peanut butter = energy + satisfaction)

DON’T EAT AFTER 8 PM!”

This might be good advice, but not because late night calories are really any worse than daytime calories. Most of the time late night snacks are our worst ones. High fat, high sugar snacks that don’t actually serve any purpose to sate hunger. Try not to go more than 5 hours without eating during the day to avoid being famished late at night, and try to contain your eating hours roughly within a 12-hour window – that alone might help you save a couple hundred calories per day!

Consider these myths BUSTED