Produce

Taste The Rainbow: A Visual Nutrition Guide

Eating a “rainbow” of fruits and vegetables reduces the risk for chronic disease, by ensuring you are providing your body with all the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and nutrition it needs.

The different colors are made possible different phytochemicals and can be an easy way to visually see what vitamins and minerals fruits and veggies provide. If you tend to eat the same colors all the time, you are likely missing out on certain green, red, white, purple/blue, and/or yellow/orange phytonutrients.

Still Not Convinced?

Generally, when we think of eating protein it’s not a vegetable. Did you know 1 cup of broccoli has almost 6 grams of protein?!!? In addition to being a protein source, broccoli and it’s green friends offer calcium, iron, folate, and B vitamins. Folate, a B vitamin, is important to make DNA and genetic material, especially for pregnant women’s developing babies, and warding off heart disease and depression. So let’s start there shall we?

GREEN

Start by adding a serving of a nutritionally dense vegetable like kale and spinach to check that GREEN phytonutrient box. Leafy greens are generally contain omega-3 fatty acids which are important and sometimes difficult to work your diet. Vitamin K is another great reason to seek out greens.

Make it even simpler by tossing a handful of spinach in your smoothie…you won’t even taste it! I know that sounds like BS – go try it!

ORANGE/YELLOW

ORANGE/YELLOW fruits and vegetables improve your immune system and promote eye health (reduced risk of cataracts and macular degeneration) with their vitamin A and C. Try adding your “orange” colors like orange bell peppers, carrots, yellow summer squash, roasted winter squash and/or fruits like mandarin orange slices to your salads.

RED

Foods with RED phytochemicals have a very protective antioxidant effect. They can can ward off or inhibit tumors in our bodies. Try some red peppers, tomatoes, beets, cherries, apples, watermelon, and more!

BLUE/PURPLE

Like red fruit and vegetables, BLUE/PURPLE foods are plump with antioxidants especially anthocyanin. Berries are a powerhouse when it comes to antioxidants, helping to protect the skin, aid in cardiovascular health, and improve our memory!

Pro Tips

• When shopping, look at your cart. If you find most of your choices are the same one or two colors, swap out a few to increase the colors — and phytonutrients — in your cart.

• 1/2 cup of chopped raw vegetables or fruit makes one serving. Less dense foods, like leafy greens, take up more space, so 1 cup chopped counts as a serving.

• Think in twos when it comes to vegetable/fruit servings. Try to eat two servings in the morning, two in the afternoon, and two at night.

• We have a tremendous amount of access to fresh vegetables this time of year, but keep in mind that frozen vegetables are picked and frozen quickly, thus retaining virtually the same nutrient density as fresh – even though the flavor may be slightly affected.

Gear Up For Your Spring Garden!

The winter can start to feel quite long this time of year – especially with seemingly endless winter vortices, storms and bitter cold – but Spring planting, gardens, and produce are just around the corner!

If starting seeds indoors, now is the time to start your broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, lettuce, and eggplant! As soon as the soil can be worked, spinach and parsley seeds can be tossed in the ground! This week we’re talking about different ways to obtain and grow your own local produce.

Find help in growing your own produce through your local county horticultural department!

In the Green Bay, WI area go to https://www.co.brown.wi.us/ and navigate to Departments/ UW-Extension area you will find tons of resources like classes and articles to help you with gardening needs (and a lot of community resources that you may not even know about!).

There is specifically a page for Urban Horticulture and Natural Resources Program which has weekly articles and resources for soil testing, plant identification, and more.

Find Local Produce Through a CSA:

What is a CSA? In Consumer Supported Agriculture (CSA), a farmer offers a certain number of “shares” to the public in return for a seasonal fee of anywhere from $350-$700 depending on the farmer and program.

Shares typically consist of a box of produce, but other farm products may also be included like jams, baked goods, eggs, soaps, herbs, and more! Many farmers will team up with other local farmers or businesses to provide the largest selection of fruit, vegetables, animal, and/or dairy products they can.

Now is the time to get signed up! Typically farmers take a survey from their pledged consumers before the planting season so they can be sure to provide as much of the things you want as they can. What could be better??

You can find local CSA’s by searching www.localharvest.org. Wisconsin members check out the CSA delivered right here to Ellipse Fitness Allouez! Healthy Ridge Farm, now offering ½ shares too!

Read our past blog post on CSA’s here!

Get to Your Local Farmer’s Market!

Not sure where to find one close to you? Check out localharvest.org and click on Farmer’s Markets where you can search your city or zip code to see a map and listing of markets near you!

The Green Bay WINTER Farmer’s market, weekly at the KI Center, just wrapped but, keep an eye out next season to satisfy your needs for local products when it is frosty out!

Community Garden Blitz!

In the Green Bay area, the Brown County UW Extension teams up with New Leaf Foods with a program called Green Bay Garden Blitz, to provide the resources and knowledge of urban gardening by selling and installing raised garden beds, with the help of volunteers, at a low cost ($175 for an 8’x4’ rot resistant box including delivery, installation, and soil)!

They also provide experienced gardener mentors for new growers. Since 2014, 547 gardens have been built in Green Bay through this program. This year even local public schools will benefit from boxes being installed at school locations allowing classrooms to learn first-hand about healthy food and nutrition (www.newleaffoods.org).

Boost Winter Nutrition with Sprouts and Microgreens!

It’s winter and it feels like it can be harder to get more nutrient dense foods like lush greens from the garden and ripe tomatoes from the vine. Try bringing the simplest of gardens indoors!

You can grow microgreens and sprout your own seeds and grains to add a major boost of vitamins and minerals to your meals.

Microgreens

Do you eat microgreens? No matter what the season, microgreens can be grown near a sunny window year-round!

Microgreens are harvested after the first set of true leaves have sprouted in 1-3 weeks. Snow pea shoots, red beets, purple and green basil, pak choi, cilantro, parsley and mesclun mix germinate and grow to microgreen size in about two weeks.

Add microgreens into your next salad, sandwich, stir-fry or just eat by themselves! Check out this DIY video tutorial here!

Sprouts

Differing from microgreens, sprouts are harvested within just a couple days of breaking away from the seed or legume. Plants grown specifically for their sprouts are grown in water and either dark or partial light.

Grow your own sprouts at home with a mason jar and cheesecloth or to make getting started easier, you can purchase a special sprouting container that has a screen/sieve built into the cover and sits on an angle to drain water best.

Why So Expensive?

Well first off, the cost comes way down when you do it yourself! But long story short: Just think, a seed can produce a full plant or it can produce one sprout. Microgreens and sprouts have a higher cost due to the number of seeds it requires to create your end-product. Have extra garden seeds left over? Throw them in a pot with soil, densely, and create your own microgreens at home!

Sprouted Grain Bread

I eat sprouts…is that the same thing that is in sprouted grain bread?

Basically, yes. Most sprouts are from pulses/beans where most breads are made from whole grain seeds that are just starting to sprout, called sprouted grains. Seeds are living things! When sprouted, they are easily digestible since their starch is broken down, having a minimal effect on blood sugar and contain more protein, vitamin c, folate, fiber and B vitamins, and essential amino acids than their non-sprouted counterparts. Some people with allergenic tendency towards grains find less sensitivity to sprouted grains since they have less starch.

Note: Generally, sprouted grain foods should be refrigerated to avoid bacteria that can grow on them (think warm, moist environment for sprouting to occur). Therefore, the truest “sprouted grain” products will be found in the refrigerated or frozen section. One of the cleanest and well-known breads in the frozen section are the Ezekiel brand products that come in bread, buns, and wraps. Slightly more processed versions, that are also then less dense, that are not in the frozen section would be Dave’s Killer Bread – Sprouted and Angelic Bakehouse products.

Pumpkin Recipes Galore for a Very Delicious Halloween Season!

It’s pumpkin season!

Let’s Kick It Off With Some Fun Facts:
– Pumpkins are a winter squash native to North America
– In other parts of the world ANY winter squash is referred to as a pumpkin)
– Because a pumpkin contains seeds, scientifically it would be classified as a fruit, though nutritionally it’s more like a vegetable
– Pumpkins are 94% water (low calorie!) and high in vitamin A (beta-carotene) and fiber
– Beta-carotene may reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancers. Grab your pumpkins and pumpkin puree this week to try some delicious new seasonal recipes!

As a storage crop, pumpkins can be stored in a cool dry place for up to 2 months. The best pumpkins to cook with are “pie pumpkins” which are a smaller and sweeter variety as opposed to the ones you carve for Halloween.

Know The Difference!

It may sound obvious to some, but you must be sure to make the right choice when grabbing canned pumpkin puree from the store!

There is a difference between “Pumpkin” and “Pumpkin Pie Mix”, although the cans sometimes look darn near identical.

Pumpkin Pie Mix however can have as many as 10-15 grams MORE sugar per serving!! And that adds up fast. Pumpkin is naturally sweet on it’s own, consider just adding some nutmeg, cinnamon and clove for authentic pie flavoring!

Let's Get Cooking!    

Flourless Pumpkin Muffins

These Healthy Flourless Pumpkin Muffins are moist, delicious, and super easy to make. They’re gluten-free, oil-free, dairy-free, and refined sugar-free!

Pumpkin Chocolate Yogurt

Combine Greek yogurt with pumpkin puree, honey, cinnamon, and cocoa powder – Enjoy!

Crustless Pumpkin Pie

Did someone say PIE? We would be foolish not to mention such a thing in pumpkin season after all…

This recipe recommends your sugar of choice or xylitol which is often used as a sugar-free substitute. Xylitol is a naturally occurring alcohol in many plants and contains 2.4 calories per gram in comparison to 4 calories per gram for table sugar.

Tired of the Same Old Protein Shake?

• 1 scoop vanilla protein powder
• 10 oz unsweetened almond milk
• 1/4 cup pumpkin purée (try frozen puree for a thicker consistency!)
• 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
• 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
• 1 cup ice
Blend and enjoy!

Healthy Pumpkin Soup

Velvety, creamy, rich and smooth…this is such an easy, healthy pumpkin soup recipe that you will be able to pull off in no time!

Blueberry Pumpkin Oat Muffins

This recipe replaces the oil or butter with pumpkin puree and applesauce which keeps the muffins moist without losing flavor. By having one of these instead of your standard coffee shop blueberry muffin, you’ll save 200 calories and 18g of fat!

Find the full recipe here!

How d’You Like Them Apples?!

It’s that time of year again! Go out to a local orchard and pick some fresh apples! Did you know many store-bought apples could have been in cold storage for almost a whole YEAR before they end up in your kitchen?

Fun Apple Facts!

• Apples ripen 6-10 times faster at room temperature than if refrigerated.

• Many store-bought apples could have been in cold storage for almost a year before they end up in your kitchen!

• The ONLY apple native to North America is the crabapple.

• It takes 2 pounds of apples to make a 9-inch apple pie, and about 36 apples to make a gallon of apple cider!

• Did you know? Apples are grown in ALL 50 states!

Why You NEED Apples in Your Life!

• A standard apple contains less than 100 calories and is a good source for fiber and vitamin C!

• Apples help lower cholesterol and the risk of type 2 diabetes, so as the saying goes…”An apple a day keeps the doctor away!”

• Apples are high in polyphenols which act as antioxidants, so they are great for your immune system and heart!

Love Apples, but Tired of Eating Them Plain?

We’ve got you covered! Check out these great, simple recipes to have your apples all kinds of different ways!

Apple Pie Energy Bites

– Packed with fresh apples, dried cranberries, nuts and warm spices, these bite-sized snacks are full of protein and will boost your energy to get you through the day! Ready in only 10 minutes!

Grandma’s Apple Butter (No Sugar Added!)

– This apple butter contains only the natural sugars of the apples, and is made in the Instant Pot in just one hour!

Slow-Cooker Apple Sauce

– What I love about this recipe is that it’s just about as easy as it gets– the only ingredients are apples and water, and all you have to do is throw them in a slow cooker…

Want even more great Apple Recipes?? Check out our blog post from last apple season for more!

Show Me!

“Squash” the Boring or Tired Menu with Brand New Recipes!

It’s squash season!

Now is the time to munch on some squash while it is at its peak in flavor and nutrition. Pick it up in bulk for cheap at your local markets, because squash can be stored in a cool, dry, and well-ventilated area (like a basement) for months in most cases! Keep squash on hand for those days where you may not have planned well enough and run out of vegetables in the house!

We are going to shine a light on some lesser-known varieties, and give you some fantastic ways to use them!

Delicata Squash

Delicata squash have a cucumber-y shape but are yellow with green variegated lines and grooves. Delicata are delicious due to their sweet flavor and edible skin. Slice delicata the lengthwise, scoop out the seeds, and cut into quarter-inch moons. Place on baking sheet sprayed with oil (Mistos work great), spritz the top of the squash “moons” and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place under broiler on low. When the tops are golden brown, flip until bottom side is browned and enjoy!

Acorn Squash

Acorn squash (also called a pepper squash) has the shape of an acorn, with ridges. Like a delicata squash, this winter squash has thin skin which is edible when cooked. The mildly sweet and nutty flavor however lend itself well in savory dishes where it is a base layer or by itself in sweet dishes.

It’s also the king of squash nutritionally speaking with the most folate, calcium, magnesium and potassium! 1 cup of cooked acorn squash has more potassium than 2 bananas and 9 grams of fiber (adult men need 38g/day and adult women need 25g/day).

PRO TIP: Acorn squash is HARD! To cut it, try microwaving for approx. 3 minutes before cutting to make it easier.

Butternut Squash

Coming in second place, nutritionally, is Butternut squash. Butternut squash has a sweet, nutty flavor that is perfect for simply cubing and roasting in the oven with a little olive oil, salt, and pepper! This squash can also offer a healthy sweet treat by tossing it with cinnamon, maple syrup, and salt until caramelized in the oven – YUM!

Butternut squash, with its sweet flavor, can also be substituted for Mexican dishes that often contain sweet potatoes. Although you likely will not eat a whole butternut squash in one sitting, one butternut squash has over 350% of your vitamin A requirements!

Spaghetti Squash

Although spaghetti squash offers the lowest nutritional density of the squashes, it’s also a great low carb and low calorie vegetable option or substitute for heavy starches like pasta! Eat spaghetti squash on its own, maybe tossed with a little olive oil, salt, and pepper or swap it out for noodles in your favorite dish.

Now Let’s Get Cooking!

Stuffed Acorn Squash

Filled with brown rice, lean ground beef, tomatoes and warming spices this dish is a comforting and splendidly colorful meal loaded with earthy and delicious flavors!

Turkey Mushroom Apple Acorn Squash

Looking for a simple, nutritious dinner? This recipe is perfect for a quick meal and filled with warm winter flavors!

Butternut Squash Enchilada Casserole

20 minutes prep time, major flavor, and easily converted to vegan!

Mexican Stuffed Butternut Squash

This weeknight dinner might look fancy, but it’s unbelievably easy to make! Savory, wholesome, vegetarian goodness in under an hour

Spaghetti Squash

The flesh of spaghetti squash comes out in long strands, very much resembling the noodles for which it is named. In this recipe, the ‘noodles’ are tossed with vegetables and feta cheese.

There’s No Way You Knew These Things About Berries!

Berry picking season is here! Whether you pick your own berries, get them through a CSA or local market consider adding them to your next meal plan! Berries are loaded with antioxidants, fiber, and immune-boosting vitamin C. This week we are going to deliver the facts on nature’s candy, and spruce up some old Ellipse Classic Recipes!

Let’s start by adding any and all types of berries to our Ellipse Protein Pancakes recipe! Just a few ingredients and they pack a serious nutritional punch!

Strawberries

Strawberries taste best at room temperature, but they are also one of the most perishable! What a paradox…
As soon as you get your berries consume the ones with bruises, they are the ripest. Compost any that show signs of mold. Wash your berries only once you’re ready to eat them. If your berries were commercially produced and may have pesticides on them, soak in a container of water with 1 tsp of baking soda for about 15 minutes before using. Berries will stay best when stored in a single layer, so it might be worth taking them out of the container you generally find them in.

Fun Facts!
• Because of their natural level of nitrate, strawberries have been shown to increase endurance for a workout!
• Strawberries are the only fruit that wear their seeds on the outside! Although that fact means that by technicality strawberries aren’t even a fruit since fruits have their seeds on the inside, like blueberries. Strawberries are part of the rose family. Are you starting to feel like you don’t really know your fruits at all??

Try strawberries by making your own yummy Yogurt Bark!

Blueberries

Blueberries make a great frozen snack right out of the freezer! Freeze your berries by washing, patting dry, and freezing on a cookie sheet in a single layer before moving to a bag or container to freeze for up to a year.

Fun Facts!
• Blueberries can be used as a natural food dye. It’s thought that back in colonial times, colonists boiled blueberries with milk to create grey paint.
• Blueberries are only 1 of 3 fruits native to North America! (Cranberries, Blueberries and Concord Grapes)

Pair blueberries or other types of berries with nectarines and almonds in this delicious and healthy Couscous Fruit Salad!

Raspberries

Raspberries are known as an aggregate fruit, creating bead-like pockets called a drupelets from multiple ovaries (Yes, plants have ovaries). Based on how it grows, each drupelet could be considered a fruit on it its own! Unlike many fruits, unripe raspberries do not ripen after they have been picked. Once it’s picked, that’s that.

Fun Facts!
• One raspberry has approximately 100-120 druplets, meaning EACH raspberry has 100-120 seeds! Got a toothpick?
• Raspberries don’t just come in red, but can be purple, gold or black in colour! The gold ones are the sweetest variety, and very tasty.

Raspberries are a no-brainer addition to so many recipes, but start by mixing them into some Banana “Nice” Cream!

Blackberries

Blackberries, like raspberries, are an aggregate fruit. But unlike raspberries, they are produced from one ovary. With that difference, when you pick a blackberry the center stays intact, unlike a raspberry.

Fun Facts!
• Blackberries were used to treat gout by the ancient Greeks because of their anti-inflammatory properties!
• blackberries are known by a variety of names including brambleberries, dewberries, and thimbleberries.

Add blackberries in to our classic Ellipse Breakfast Muffins!

4 Lean, Healthy Meals in 5 Minutes!

Need some quick and easy weekday meals? Weekend prep doesn’t have to be some arduous marathon requiring hours of time and every pot and pan in your kitchen! This week we’ve got 4 quick and easy recipes that you can crank out in a flash and feel happy about your meals without agonizing labor!

This week start by buying 4 pounds of Ground Turkey. Brown 3 pounds, cool and separate into 1 pound containers to freeze. With your fourth make these Veggie Loaded Meatballs!

Delicious meatballs packed with broccoli, carrots, baby spinach, green onions, and garlic! Just swap out the beef for to keep things simpler this week!

First? Go Shopping!

Here’s your grocery list for all 4 recipes!

• 4 Pounds Ground Turkey
• Rice (cook ahead if possible!)
• 1 Bag Favorite Frozen Veggies
• Zoodles (Zucchini Noodles, found at most grocery stores in the produce section)
• 1 pound Carrots
• 2 pounds Broccoli
• 2 heads garlic
• 1 small ginger root
• 1 small bag of Baby Spinach
• 1 bunch Green Onion
• 2 Avocados
• Flax Meal (only need 2 TBSP)
• 1 can Tomatoes
• 1 can Black Beans
• 1 pack Taco Seasoning
• 1 pack Ranch Seasoning
• Soy Sauce
• Chili Paste
• Plain Greek Yogurt

Optional Extras:

• 1 can low sodium Cream of Chicken Soup
• Feta Cheese
• Fresh Parsley or Basil
• Hot Sauce

(Creamy?) Turkey and Veggies

Ground Turkey + 1 Bag Frozen Vegetables + Dry Ranch Seasoning
(or substitute YOUR favorite seasoning combo)

Thaw one of your pounds of turkey, toss in a pan with a bag of your favorite frozen vegetables, and your seasoning!

Need a more “comforting” taste? Add up to a can of a low sodium cream of chicken soup and maybe serve over rice or quinoa!

Zoodles + Meatballs

Save time by buying a container of zoodles (zucchini noodles) since they are now quite common in most produce departments. Rewarm your meatballs in the oven or toaster oven while sautéing zoodles with olive and seasonings.

Get an added veggie boost by tossing in a handful or two of spinach. Serve as is or get creative with some tossed feta cheese or fresh parsley and/or basil!

Speedy Stir Fry

Ground Turkey + Onion + Broccoli + Carrots + Chili Paste

Combine some garlic, soy sauce, and ginger with ground turkey and set aside.
Stir Fry onions, broccoli, and carrots in vegetable oil.
Remove from the pan to a bowl.
Reheat turkey and sauce, recombine with veggies, and add chili paste.

Speed up this recipe even more by buying a bag of pre cut broccoli from your produce department or a “stir fry raw mix”. Rice could be pulled from the freezer and microwaved.

Full recipe here!

Rapido Burrito Bowl

Ground Turkey + Tomatoes + Black Beans + Avocado

Heat turkey and add taco seasoning. In a bowl combine rice, taco turkey, tomatoes, black beans, diced avocado and a sauce made of plain Greek yogurt and hot sauce.

Full recipe here!

CSA – Do You Get It??

It’s come to our attention that many people are still unsure what a CSA is and why they are such a great thing to be a part of! So…what is it?

Consumer Supported Agriculture (CSA)

A farmer offers a certain number of “shares” to the public. Shares typically consist of a box of produce, but other farm products may also be included like jams, baked goods, eggs, soaps, herbs, and more! Many farmers will team up with other local farmers or businesses to provide the largest selection of fruit, vegetables, animal, and/or dairy products they can.

Now is the time to get signed up! Typically farmers take a survey from their pledged consumers before the planting season so they can be sure to provide as much of the things you want as they can. Let your voice be heard by signing up before seeds are in the ground!

How does it all start?

Interested consumers purchase a share/membership and in return receive a box, bag or basket of seasonal produce each week throughout the farming season. Although half shares are available, a full share will range somewhere between $400-$700 per season for weekly deliveries often from June through late fall. Not bad at all if you compared the same amount of produce with your grocery store, and you get MUCH fresher and generally more sustainably produced food!

Feel good about your place in the food chain!

With a very large amount of produce in supermarkets being trucked and/or shipped in from other regions or countries, a great deal of farmers have turned to monoculture (growing one crop in massive quantities) in order to turn a profit. You can help keep traditional farming alive and provide a reliable income for small farmers by sharing in a CSA program!

CSAs provide the freshest of local produce and sometimes the opportunity to try produce that you may never have known existed! That is super exciting for those bored with the same old selection at the store. Many CSA farms have a couple of events throughout the season which allow its members to visit the farm and see where their food comes from! Some farmers also provide newsletters/communications sharing with their members ways of preparing the vegetables they received and different recipes to utilize their weekly bounty.

It sounds great! What’s the catch?

Well as we all know, growing anything outdoors poses potential problems due to weather, pests, and other conditions beyond our control. Every year farmers take the same risk and, although they take preventive measures to prevent as much loss as possible, sometimes full crops can get destroyed. But turn this around in your head; CSAs provide the chance for the community to support the farmers and share in that risk! Understand that sometimes you may get less of your favorite crop or it may be less than perfect, but on the flip side when crops are abundant you can find yourself with more produce than you ever could have expected! This usually makes you the favorite neighbor on the block when you have to offload extra produce or share a dish you made extra of!

Check out the local CSA options at www.localharvest.org and search based on your city or zip code.

Step Up Your Snack Game!

Healthy Eating can be quite a challenge. Nearly anyone who has tried to make positive changes to their diet can admit this. As you start to build new habits however, you might find that meals are more manageable, but what do you do when hunger strikes in between meals? For many of us, our workplace has a room similar to this one that begs to answer the question…

The word “Snack” is most often associated with something less healthy, or natural, than a small meal, but keep thinking about how you can form your days around small meals, whether that is 3 or 5 times a day. No matter what though, sometimes you need that fast snack. Here are some great options for you:

Be prepared!

Keep It Simple

Roll a piece of cheese or a pickle in some lunch meat to get a quick protein boost. Look for natural meats without added nitrates and a short ingredient list.

Chia Pudding

Whether for a breakfast or for a snack, chia pudding can fit the bill! Simply combine chia seeds with coconut milk, vanilla, cinnamon, and maple syrup.
Get creative by adding protein powder, fresh fruit, cocoa powder…you name it!
Check out the recipe here!

Ellipse Breakfast Muffins

Need a quick breakfast that can be eaten as is or jazzed up? Check out our Classic Ellipse Breakfast Muffins with just oatmeal, egg beaters, applesauce, and baking soda.
Add-On’s: nut butter, yogurt, etc
Add-In’s: fresh or dried fruit
Add-With’s: cottage cheese and fruit!

Need Something Salty?

Try roasted chickpeas! Toss drained chickpeas with olive oil and salt/garlic salt and bake 30-40 minutes at 450 degrees until browned and crispy. Want a little kick? Add a dash of cayenne pepper!

Apples A New Way

Apple Snack

Have a sweet tooth that NEEDS to be tamed NOW? Try slicing an apple all the way across to get full flat circles slices. Spread nut butter on the slice and add toppings like chopped nuts, unsweetened coconut, or even a few dark chocolate chips or cacao nibs.

Make a "Small Meal"

“Crack Slaw” has a great combination of protein, vegetables, and seasonings! The recipe calls for Dole Coleslaw mix but consider using broccoli slaw for an extra vitamin boost! Find it here!

Sweet Craving?

Get your sweet fix by mixing peanut butter (or powdered peanut butter) with plain greek yogurt and maybe even a dash of sugar-free pudding mix to make a great fruit dip!