Health Food

Make the Most of The Late Summer Harvest!

Summer is almost over but there’s still plenty of vegetables that are still being harvested or still need to be harvested. Late Summer Harvests include vegetables like onions, potatoes, garlic, shallots, leeks, cabbages, celery, eggplant, peppers, pumpkins and winter squash! This week we will be talking about recipes to go with the late summer harvest!

Celery

Grab some celery from your local farmer’s market or CSA and appreciate it since celery can be a little tough to grow…it isn’t greatly tolerant to heat or cold or drought. This finicky plant is great for cooking, salads, and more though. Plus, it boasts wonderful health benefits like reducing inflammation, aiding in digestion, and helping to alkalize our often highly acid diets.

Bell Peppers

Harvested in late summer, they are a member of the nightshade family which is the same family as tomatoes, eggplant, and potatoes (but not sweet potatoes!). Some people have sensitivities to nightshade produce that may experience gas, joint inflammation, headaches, and more. BUT, if you don’t have sensitivities they are also high in vitamins and antioxidants including a boatload of vitamin C. Red peppers pack the most nutrition since they have been on the vine the longest. TIP: All bell peppers start out green then change to yellow or orange before ripening to red.

Leeks

Leek’s are good at holding onto grit, so let’s talk prep! The tops will look darker than the rest. Cut the darkest part off and compost those or save for soup stock. Next cut off root (the fuzzy stuff at the bottom). The stem can be cut into rings or chiffonade (thin strips). Rinse the cuttings in a colander to get any grit out. TIP: Like onions and garlic let leeks sit for at least 5 minutes after cutting and before cooking.
Leeks can be tossed into pot roast, added to a pan of roasted vegetables, tossed into soups, added to a green salad, or tossed with cooked green beans to add a new flavor. Check out this link for a Salmon and Leek Dish!

Eggplant

A relative of the tomato, can be healthy when prepped in less “heavy” ways than the traditional eggplant parmesan. Eggplant is a non-starchy vegetable that can be grilled, roasted, stewed, breaded, or sautéed and can be used in many different types of recipes. Often used as a meat substitute in dishes like lasagna, it packs a meaty texture with its higher fiber content. Not sure where to start? Try this grilled eggplant and yogurt dip recipe! Just serve with pita chips or vegetables and you’re all set for your next dish to pass!

Garlic

Garlic is a perennial that grows in spring and is ready for harvest in the late summer. It is ready for harvest when the bottom two leaves turn brown. Garlic needs to be cured/dried out for about 2 weeks (like on a covered porch) before using. Rumor has it, the number of leaves on the stem will tell you how many cloves of garlic you will have! Garlic has a laundry list of health benefits, so make sure to include it in your regular recipes. Not used to using raw garlic? Just buy a garlic press and it is easier than you can imagine to mince your own garlic. BONUS: Although you probably run into vampires, garlic repels mosquitoes too!

Squash

If you are not a squash fan, odds are you just haven’t tried the right one or had it prepared in your tastes! Squash come in many varieties, textures, and flavors. Load up on different winter squash at your local farmer’s market since they can store for months in a cool dry area. Spaghetti squash are super easy to grow and can be microwaved or baked to produce strings/”noodles” that are tasty just with a little butter and salt, combined with spaghetti sauce, or added into a variety of recipes. Other squash can be roasted, pureed for sauces, and even cubed and frozen for later use. Follow this link for a Squash Breakdown!

A Dish To Pass: Healthy Version!

Ready to shop the farmer’s market? Read on and you’ll have dishes for the rest of the summer to bring to your cookouts and parties! Heading to a party, with a dish to pass, it’s a good idea to bring a healthy option that you know is “safe” for you to load your plate up with at a meal time that is often loaded with heavy/creamy salads and desserts. Come prepared!

Mango Avocado Salad

2 mangos + 2 avocados + juice of 1 lime + 1 seeded hot pepper + 1 bunch of chopped cilantro + garlic and salt to taste. Serve along with chicken and a few tortilla chips! Checkout this original Ellipse recipe here!
You’ll be the star of the party.

Skinny Broccoli Slaw

Combine broccoli florets, shredded red cabbage and carrots, sweet onions, and raisins and then top it with a dressing of plain Greek yogurt + apple cider vinegar + lemon juice and just a little sugar to offset the bitterness of your cruciferous vegetables. Get the recipe here!

Plan ahead as you’ll want this to sit and “marinate” for a couple hours for the best result. TIP: Make it even easier by purchasing a bag of “Broccoli Slaw” mix with the broccoli, cabbage and carrots all cut up for you!

Chunky Southwest Quinoa Salad

Quinoa, black beans, cherry tomatoes, red onions, and avocados. Toss with a light dressing of lime, cilantro, apple cider vinegar, olive oil, honey and spices. SO YUM! Full recipe here!
TIP: Throw a whole bag of dry black beans in the instant pot and fill water about 3x the height of the beans, set timer to 26 minutes. Perfect to flash freeze and keep in a freezer bag for salads like this one!
TIP2:
You can freeze quinoa too!

Slow-Cooker Balsamic Chicken

In a large slow cooker, add brussels sprouts and potatoes in an even layer and place chicken on top. In a small bowl whisk together balsamic vinegar, chicken broth, brown sugar, mustard, dried thyme, rosemary, oregano, and crushed red pepper flakes. Season generously with salt and pepper. Pour marinade over chicken and vegetables. Scatter all over with garlic. Cover and cook on high until chicken is fall-apart tender(4 to 5 hours). Garnish with parsley and serve with the juices. Recipe here!

Cucumber Feta Greek Yogurt Dip

Greek yogurt, English cucumber, crumbled feta, garlic, fresh dill, scallions, lemon juice. Mix everything together and put it in the fridge to cool and then you’re all set to bring it your next party or for your next snack or lunch! Recipe here!
TIP: Cut up some veggies or try it with crackers for dipping!

Healthy Spinach Dip

That’s right – a healthy version of the beloved spinach dip that you will love! This recipe includes cottage cheese, spinach, water chestnuts, plain Greek yogurt, dry vegetable soup mix, onion, and lemon juice! Serve it with an array kohlrabi, carrots, celery and other cut vegetables, melba rounds, and/or with bread chunks. Recipe here!

MUST SEE Breakfast Recipes for Whole Nutrition!

Breakfast can be on the most challenging meals to keep healthy, get protein in, and maybe even more so include vegetables in! Some will say they just don’t have time for that first meal of the day, but we have some quick and easy recipes that are sure to prove you wrong!

1. Classic Breakfast Burrito

Scramble eggs with veggies, add 2 T of salsa, and wrap in a sprouted grain/whole wheat tortilla! Need a little more healthy fat? Add some avocado!

TIP: If you need a quick healthier snack for later in the day, grab one of the tortillas and spread some peanut butter on it and roll up a banana inside!

2. DIY “Just Crack an Egg”

If you haven’t seen the Just Crack an Egg containers at your grocery store, it’s a quick and easy way to get a healthier breakfast in. (justcrackanegg.net). Peel the lid off the container and you’ll find a packet of cheese, a packet of sautéed veg, and a packet of a meat. You open all packets and combine with an egg or two and follow the microwave directions. They have 4 varieties and one is even keto friendly.

Try one or DIY: Use your Just Crack and Egg container, combine 1/4 c sautéed vegetables (like peppers, mushrooms, potato, onions), 1-2 T shredded cheese, and 2 T meat like turkey sausage or ham (one breakfast turkey sausage chopped is just about perfect!) plus your 1-2 eggs and follow the directions for microwaving.

TIP: Make your sautéed veg ahead and scoop out 1/4 c at a time and have your sausage/meat chopped/cubed.

3. Egg White Oatmeal

Mash a banana. Place in a larger bowl (so the oats don’t cook over) and combine with 1/2 c oats, 1/2 c milk or milk substitute, 3/4 c liquid egg whites, and 1/2 t cinnamon. Microwave 75 seconds, stir and continue microwaving :30/stir until fully cooked.

TIP: Make it your own! Add vanilla, walnuts, berries, flax seed, etc! (Find more here!)

4. Avocado and Egg Toast

A super easy and simple breakfast but you get everything you need in it! Get some bread (try oat nut bread or Ezekiel bread, but any bread will do) toast it, then mash up an avocado on the toast! Add either scrambled eggs on top or perhaps and over easy egg and then put whatever else you like on top! Cheese, salt, pepper, tomatoes, salsa, or spinach! You get carbs, protein, and some healthy fats!

5. Quinoa and Fruit Salad

Cook 1 c of dry quinoa. Toss with 1 c of each:
• sliced/diced strawberries • blackberries • blueberries • mango

Top with a choice of dressings: 1/4 c honey, 2T lime juice OR combine 1/8 c olive oil, 1/8 c apple cider vinegar, lemon zest and juice and a dash of honey or sugar.

TIP: Make it your own…Top with your favorite herbs like mint, basil and/or chopped walnuts, pine nuts or more! Too non-traditional for breakfast? Bring it to your next summer BBQ!

6. The GO-TO smoothie

Add some GREEN veggies and some extra phytonutrients to your favorite smoothie for a vitamin boost. Not sure where to start? Check out Precision Nutrition’s guide of how to build the perfect super shake/smoothie that guides you through picking a liquid, protein powder, veggie, fruit, fat, and topper.

BOOKMARK this important link!

Nutritional Yeast: What It Does For You and How to Cook With It

Nutritional Yeast 101

Nutritional yeast, “NOOCH” for short, is a deactivated yeast that. It is derived from a species of yeast know as Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, which is the same species that Brewer’s yeast and Baker’s yeast are derived from. They differ, HOWEVER, in that brewer’s yeast is grown only on hops and bakers yeast is active, whereas nutritional yeast can be grown on a variety of sources and it is put through a heating and drying process that renders it inactive.

Primarily, nutritional yeast is used as a supplement for those with dietary restrictions to add not only additional flavor to your meal, but also several health benefits along with it.

What’s In It?

It is dairy free, usually gluten free, low in fat and contains no sugar or soy. Nutritional yeast is an EXCELLENT source of vitamins, minerals and high-quality protein. Specifically (per 1/4 cup serving), there are only:

• 60 calories

• 8 grams of protein

• 3 grams of fiber

• Vitamin & minerals (including numerous B Vitamins, Potassium, Calcium and Iron)

Benefits

Nutritional yeast serves as a versatile source of supplementation for those in need of a little something extra in their food due to dietary restrictions.

• It is a complete protein, containing all nine essential amino acids that humans must get from food. One tablespoon contains 2 grams of protein, which makes for an easy solution for vegans needing to add protein to their meals.

• It contains many B vitamins. One tablespoon of nutritional yeast contains 30–180% of the RDI for B vitamins and when fortified, it is especially rich in thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.

• It contains up to 30% of the RDI for trace minerals, such as zinc, selenium, manganese and molybdenum. Trace minerals are involved in gene regulation, metabolism, growth and immunity.

Potential Side Effects

While nutritional yeast is highly beneficial for most, there are some individuals for whom nutritional yeast is NOT suitable for.

Those with IBD, glaucoma, hypertension or a higher risk of gout should avoid using nutritional yeast as it may worsen their symptoms. In large doses, it can cause digestive discomfort or facial flushing due to its high fiber and niacin content, and it may also contain tyramine and MSG, which can trigger headaches in some individuals (note that MSG is only present in nutritional yeast if it has been added during processing or manufacturing). In order to avoid these side effects, you should try adding nutritional yeast into your diet by introducing it slowly and sticking to lower doses to minimize unwanted side effects.

Where Can I Find It?

You can find nutritional yeast in most grocery stores, health food shops as well as online. It comes in the form of flakes or in the form of powder and there are two types of yeast:

• Unfortified: does not contain any added vitamins or minerals. It only contains the vitamins and minerals that are naturally produced by the yeast cells as they grow.
• Fortified: contains synthetic vitamins added during the manufacturing process to boost nutrient content. If vitamins have been added to the yeast, they will be included in the ingredients list.

How To Use It

Nutritional yeast’s flavor can be described as savory, umami or cheesy. It is often used as an ingredient in creamy, dairy-free cheese substitutes and as a topper for foods such as popcorn, pasta, and French fries!

Here are a few quick examples on how to incorporate/substitute it into meals:

• On popcorn as alternative to butter/salt
• In risotto instead of parmesan cheese
• Added to creamy soups
• Added to scrambled eggs or tofu scramble
• Mixed into nut roast or stuffing
• Vegan cheese sauce (recipe here) which can be used in Vegan Mac-N-Cheese!

Taste The Rainbow: A Visual Nutrition Guide

Eating a “rainbow” of fruits and vegetables reduces the risk for chronic disease, by ensuring you are providing your body with all the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and nutrition it needs.

The different colors are made possible different phytochemicals and can be an easy way to visually see what vitamins and minerals fruits and veggies provide. If you tend to eat the same colors all the time, you are likely missing out on certain green, red, white, purple/blue, and/or yellow/orange phytonutrients.

Still Not Convinced?

Generally, when we think of eating protein it’s not a vegetable. Did you know 1 cup of broccoli has almost 6 grams of protein?!!? In addition to being a protein source, broccoli and it’s green friends offer calcium, iron, folate, and B vitamins. Folate, a B vitamin, is important to make DNA and genetic material, especially for pregnant women’s developing babies, and warding off heart disease and depression. So let’s start there shall we?

GREEN

Start by adding a serving of a nutritionally dense vegetable like kale and spinach to check that GREEN phytonutrient box. Leafy greens are generally contain omega-3 fatty acids which are important and sometimes difficult to work your diet. Vitamin K is another great reason to seek out greens.

Make it even simpler by tossing a handful of spinach in your smoothie…you won’t even taste it! I know that sounds like BS – go try it!

ORANGE/YELLOW

ORANGE/YELLOW fruits and vegetables improve your immune system and promote eye health (reduced risk of cataracts and macular degeneration) with their vitamin A and C. Try adding your “orange” colors like orange bell peppers, carrots, yellow summer squash, roasted winter squash and/or fruits like mandarin orange slices to your salads.

RED

Foods with RED phytochemicals have a very protective antioxidant effect. They can can ward off or inhibit tumors in our bodies. Try some red peppers, tomatoes, beets, cherries, apples, watermelon, and more!

BLUE/PURPLE

Like red fruit and vegetables, BLUE/PURPLE foods are plump with antioxidants especially anthocyanin. Berries are a powerhouse when it comes to antioxidants, helping to protect the skin, aid in cardiovascular health, and improve our memory!

Pro Tips

• When shopping, look at your cart. If you find most of your choices are the same one or two colors, swap out a few to increase the colors — and phytonutrients — in your cart.

• 1/2 cup of chopped raw vegetables or fruit makes one serving. Less dense foods, like leafy greens, take up more space, so 1 cup chopped counts as a serving.

• Think in twos when it comes to vegetable/fruit servings. Try to eat two servings in the morning, two in the afternoon, and two at night.

• We have a tremendous amount of access to fresh vegetables this time of year, but keep in mind that frozen vegetables are picked and frozen quickly, thus retaining virtually the same nutrient density as fresh – even though the flavor may be slightly affected.

6 Foods for a Higher Metabolism!

Ready to start a fire?? These foods (and drinks) will not only jumpstart your metabolism, but also offer you other great health and weight management benefits!

1. Cinnamon

Loved by most, but many don’t really know where it comes from other than maybe that it comes from a tree. Cinnamon is made by cutting the stems of cinnamon trees. The inner bark is extracted and the woody parts removed. When it dries, you get that curled wood that you see sold as cinnamon sticks. Cinnamaldehyde is the active ingredient responsible for cinnamon’s ability to boost the metabolism.

In regards to body protective antioxidants, cinnamon wins by a landslide even over foods like garlic and oregano! Cinnamon helps fight insulin resistance (we need insulin to move sugar from our bloodstream to our cells…when resisted, we have too much sugar floating around) and it interferes, in a good way, with how much sugar enters our blood stream in the first place after a meal. Both HUGE factors for weight maintenance and metabolic health.

2. Green Tea

In addition to cancer fighting and anti-inflammatory properties, Green Tea can help boost your metabolism and increase your fat burning rate! It is unclear whether these benefits are attributed to caffeine alone or to Tea specifically. Studies have also shown that drinking Green Tea may improve insulin sensitivity.

Fun Fact: Oolong and Black Tea come from the same plant as Green Tea, the difference simply being how long the leaves are allowed to oxidize which turns them black (Oolong being in the middle of Green and Black Tea). While the antioxidant profile differs, generally the health benefits remain constant from Green to Black Tea.

3. Spicy Peppers

Spicy food heats you up – no doubt about that! But eating spicy peppers (or cayenne pepper) at a meal, for example, burns only about 10 extra calories. However, consuming capsaicin has been shown to reduce overall hunger throughout the day which certainly can help you adhere to your diet! It may also aid in digestive health, and in animal studies it has been shown to reduce blood pressure.

4. Coffee

Coffee can boost your metabolism up to 11% boost with its caffeine, like green tea. It seems to affect/benefit lean people most though AND if you are a regular coffee (vs occasional) drinker you may not see the same affect.

It’s not all “meh” news though…you can still have your coffee and get your protein in! Try an Iced-Mocha Coffee for the hot summer days: mix 1.5 scoops of Ellipse Chocolate Protein Powder with ½ c unsweetened almond milk. Add 1.5 cups iced coffee.

5. Spices

Kind of lumping a few things in here, but spices like ginger and turmeric can help raise your metabolism with their thermogenic effects.

Ginger can increase calorie burn by increasing blood flow and thus body temperature. Granted this increase is relatively small, it can’t hurt to add into your meal rotation. (Quick side note: Ginger can interact with certain medications like Warfarin, an anticoagulant – so refer to your doctor’s recommendation).

Grab some broccoli and sweet peppers and fresh basil at the farmer’s market for this super quick dish; Ginger Basil Chicken And Rice.

6. Coconut Oil

We’ve probably all heard that coconut oil is a good choice when it comes to oils. But why? Coconut oil offers a different effect than other oils by raising the GOOD/HDL cholesterol levels in your blood with its medium chain triglycerides and increase calories burned.

2 TBSP seems to be about the recommended amount per day to help reduce belly fat.

BBQ Side Dishes and Summer Salads!

It is Summer time and BBQ season, so this week we have several recipes for you using the fresh produce you should be able to find at your local markets!

Green Beans

Green beans are in season! Like other legumes, green beans contain high fiber to keep you full longer. 1 cup of green beans has just 44 calories plus offers a good source of vitamin K, C, and folate. Eating green beans fresh or with a quick steam method will retain the most nutrients. Store fresh green beans unwashed in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer for up to 7 days.

Try this marinated bean salad to bring to your next BBQ: it combines green beans, kidney beans, and lima beans (swap out if you are not a lima fan!), tomato, and fresh herbs, olive oil, and lemon juice. That perfect “Fresh” salad for the summer!

Tomatoes

Keep ripe tomatoes on the counter away from sunlight. When the tomatoes become (too) soft, toss in the fridge. Keep in mind at the end of the season that green tomatoes can be placed stem side down in a paper bag to ripen (give it time though, it usually takes a while!). Tomatoes are full of water and fiber as well as a good source of vitamin C, potassium, vitamin K, and folate.

Serve yourself up a simple fresh side dish: 1 chopped cucumber + 1 chopped tomato + olive oil and salt. Delish!

Potato Salad

Going to that BBQ and need a dish to pass? Potato salads can be laden with heavy dressings and little nutrition. Add some extra veg and pull back on the heaviness with this potato salad makeover!

Tri-Colored Pepper Potato Salad uses red potatoes, sweet peppers, onions and a lighter sauce of white wine, chicken broth, lemon juice, garlic, dijon, and salt/pepper! TIP: Make it extra colorful with purple, red, and golden potatoes. You can find a 5# bag of cute little fully washed rainbow baby potatoes at Costco. Just cut in half and you are ready to go!

Berries and Melons

Blueberries and melons are coming into season! Find a local blueberry picking patch by searching Google for “Pick your own blueberries” and local patches will pop up. Blueberries are loaded with fiber and antioxidants (one of the highest antioxidant foods actually) plus low in calories. Melons are also a good addition to your diet with their high-water content, vitamin C and other great nutrients depending on the melon choice.

Bring the best of both worlds together with this Melon Berry Fruit Salad. Combine melons and berries with honey, lime juice, and mint. A perfect summer side dish to bring to your next BBQ/picnic. TIP: Store cut melon for about 3 days. If you find yourself with extra, freeze on a cookie sheet before tossing into a container for easy use.

Carrots

Carrots are coming into season! Did you know baby carrots have a lower nutritional vitamin quantity than full sized carrots? BUT WAIT! Baby carrots are actually a small carrot/carrots not allowed to fully mature, NOT the carrots we typically think of in bags (called manufactured baby carrots).

Bagged “baby” carrots are typically carrots that are grown closer together to have a narrow shaft but grow 8-10 inches long. They are then chopped apart and tumbled. The peels go to compost or are used as cattle feed. These carrots have similar, if not the same, nutritional quantities as their standard counterpart. When baby bagged carrots were first “invented” they were shaved down “ugly” carrots.

Summer Squash

Summer squash includes yellow squash, zucchini, and cute little different squash like the pattypan (looks like a little flying disc with scalloped edges) or ball squashes.

With both green beans and summer squash coming into season, there’s no better combination than the Summer Chicken Sauté from our own blog!

Pizza! Numerous Healthy Twists

Pizza! Just the name may make your mouth water. Pizza, by definition, is a dish consisting of a flat, round base of dough baked and topped with tomato sauce and cheese, typically with added meat or vegetables. BUT…the idea of pizza has transformed a lot over the years and lucky for our waistlines has taken on some healthier forms. We’ll share some of those options this week!

Portabello Pizza

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place portabello mushroom caps, with gills and stems removed, upside down on a baking sheet. Top with salsa, pine nuts and parmesan cheese. Bake for 10-12 minutes. That’s it!

Cauliflower Pizza Crust

Buy it or make it yourself! Cauliflower crusts can be relatively easy to find for purchase now. Make sure to check your labels though! In some cases, a cauliflower crust can have more carbs, fat, and calories than a regular crust…even if it’s gluten-free and low-carb!

However, if you’re ready to give it a shot, check out our blog for a link to the basics: “Rice” a head of cauliflower, squeeze out the water, mix with egg, herbs, and cheese (yes, cheese is needed to help stick the cauliflower together and this is sometimes where recipes can go crazy) and then bake. *If you go this route, you may want to consider going lighter on the cheese knowing it’s incorporated in the crust.

Check out this recipe from ifoodreal!

Tortilla Pizza

Pizza crusts can come in sooo many forms today! There are spaghetti squash crusts, sweet potato crusts, and even chickpea crusts that you can make! Even Oprah is making her own pizzas now!

Want your pizza but making your own crust is just too much? Try using a tortilla for a crust. Many of us have tortilla’s laying around the kitchen. The trick is to get it fairly crisp in the oven before applying your toppings. Our favorite “flaky” crust tortilla is Tortilla Fresca uncooked flour tortillas, found in the refrigerated section at Costco. Once crisp, get creative with your toppings…try pesto topped with spinach, artichokes and chicken and then bake until the toppings are cooked through!

Pizza in a Pan

Yes, you can even put pizza in a pan! We’re talking skillet dishes. Want to go out on a limb? Try a pizza stir-fry that has kale, cabbage, and peppers at the heart of the recipe and then all your pizza flavors, including pepperoni, added in to satisfy that pizza desire. Get the full recipe here!

Not quite ready for the jump? Try another pizza stir-fry option that still hangs onto your mozzarella, but throws in some spinach, zucchini, mushrooms, peppers, and even banana peppers! Recipe here!

If you love the flavors of pizza, run with it, as it can lead to some healthy recipes that you may have never considered.

Quinoa Pizza Bites

Love the flavor of pizza, but you know you can’t hold back to just a slice or so? Try some veggie loaded quinoa bites! These poppable bites contain quinoa, zuccchini, and summer squash to add in an additional splash of nutrients. Toss in some italian seasoning, basil, garlic, tomato sauce and a little parmesean cheese, you’ve got yourself some healthy pizza snacks!

Pizza in a Salad

Start with a bed of greens, top with bell peppers, halved grape tomatoes, artichokes, red onions, black olives, and all your favorite vegetable favorites! Toss on some cooked/warmed turkey pepperoni or italian ground turkey and toss with a pesto vinigarette like this one!

Feel Like a Spring Chicken With These Egg Recipes!

It’s the season of spring chickens and the celebration of Easter. Why eggs in spring? Because they symbolize new life! What better time than to talk eggs!

Eggs are a great source of protein, vitamins, and minerals. Eggs contain vitamins A, E, D, and B12 plus minerals like iron and folate. Egg yolks are one of the very few foods that naturally contain vitamin D!

Not All Eggs Are Created Equal!

The most commonly found eggs in the supermarket are grain-fed: a combination of corn and soybeans. Check your labels! “Free Range” would indicate a more natural diet of seeds, green plants, and insects, thus a lower omega-6 content (the fatty acid that most of us are already getting too much of).
Some eggs like Eggland’s Best feed chickens an omega-3 rich diets and thus transfer those healthy omega-3’s into their eggs and ultimately in our bellies. Omega-3 eggs have been seen to decrease blood glucose levels. If it’s in your budget, free-range and omega-3 diet fed chickens appear to be worth the investment!

What About The Yolks?

The yolks of eggs are often seen as “bad” because of cholesterol concerns. The yolk is actually where the good nutrients are stored, however! Eggs have not been found to be associated with any form of cardiovascular disease, despite their bad cholesterol rap. 75% of the cholesterol in our bodies is created by the liver. 25% comes from food. Studies have shown, even after eating 1 egg daily for a year, no adverse effects were found (except perhaps for people who are diabetic).

Does The Shell Color Matter?

So really, why are eggs different colors? To determine what color egg a chicken will lay, check out it’s earlobes! Seriously!

White feathered chickens with white earlobes will lay white eggs. Red or Brown chickens with red earlobes will lay brown eggs. Earlobes aside, the color of the egg really has no bearing on nutrition. Now, the YOLK color is dependent on the diet a hen was fed, a more pale yellow color indicating a weaker grain-fed diet versus a more golden yellow indicating a free range type diet.

Eat Eggs for Eye Health!

Treat your eyes with a healthy egg meal! Eggs contain lutein, which helps prevent macular degeneration and cataracts. Did you know that eggs age more in one day at room temperature than in one week in the refrigerator?

Consider adding more eggs into your meal routines. Afterall, they are the most commonly consumed animal product in the world!

Boost Your Protein!

Add some protein to your day with eggs! 2 egg whites contain 7g of protein. 1 full egg has 70 calories, 6g of protein (but also then contains the 1.5g saturated fat in the yolk).
DID YOU KNOW? Younger chickens lay eggs with harder shells. Now you know!

RECIPES

Check out these healthy, delicious egg recipes from our Ellipse Fitness Recipe Archives!

Pancakes, Pie, Naps?? Yes Please!

This week we are celebrating anything and everything folks!! And we’ve got some fantastic recipes to help you celebrate some obscure holidays.

National Nap Day!

Let’s kick this week off with a very happy National Nap Day! Sleep plays a role in healing and repairing your heart and blood vessels, control body weight, and enhance memory. Sleep helps to reduce inflammation in the body.

The Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends adults get 7-8 hours of sleep per day for ideal health. Improve your sleep with the same bedtime/wake time, limiting blue light exposure (they make glasses for this now!), exercising regularly, and limiting caffeine and heavy meals in the evening.

National Pancake Day!

Love pancakes but think they are off limits? Maybe it’s time to try a few different options that may suit your goals! Have you tried Kodiak Cakes? They contain ingredients you can feel pretty good about including 21g of protein per serving when made with a milk and egg.

Or, try one of the many recipes “out there” that include oats, cottage cheese, banana, and eggs like this OR go super simple with a 3 ingredient pancake: ½ C cottage cheese, ½ c. rolled oats, and 3 eggs. Blend in a blender and cook!

National Cruciferous Day?

Alright this one isn’t real – yet! But we think it should be!

Cruciferous vegetables have been shown to have cancer-fighting attributes and contain many beneficial properties. Cauliflower has come back into fashion with all sorts of new ways to prepare it – cauliflower crusts anyone?

If you haven’t jumped onto the cruciferous wave yet, give this Cauliflower Hash recipe a whirl. It cooks up fasts and you’ll struggle not to eat the whole thing!

Chop a head of cauliflower and an onion and sauté until starting to brown. Toss in paprika, salt, pepper, and water and cook briefly until the cauliflower is tender. Add minced garlic and lemon juice and enjoy!

Happy Pi Day!

This one is for real though! (3/14…3.14, get it?)

Let’s talk PIE…better yet, PIE for dinner, not dessert! Have you tried Spaghetti Squash Pie? Think, spaghetti squash, zucchini, fresh basil and marinara all wrapped up in one dinner!

Alright, alright that one isn’t dessert though…If you need a little sweet, here’s an Apple Pie Shake recipe!

Éirinn go Brách!

Now surely you have heard of St. Patrick’s Day, but we’ve got a special smoothie to try in honor of the holiday! Skip the popular green shake that packs 63 GRAM OF SUGAR!

Green smoothies are commonly created by adding spinach to smoothies. Spinach is nutritious, but essentially tasteless in smoothies so it’s a great addition for a vitamin and mineral boost!

Try this St Patty’s Day Smoothie Treat: Blend 1 frozen banana, 1 cup spinach, ¼-1/2 Tbsp. of cocoa powder, ½-1 scoop vanilla protein powder, cacao nibs, and unsweetened almond milk to taste. Greener? Add some matcha powder! Need more healthy fats? Add some flax or hemp seeds!

Special Mention:

Happy 10 Years to Ellipse Fitness St. Louis!

It’s time to throw a party! Need to bring a dish to pass? Try a Chinese chicken salad with cabbage, lettuce, fresh herbs, and chicken. Check out this great recipe here! (you can swap iceberg lettuce for romaine for a few more nutrients and add as much cabbage as you see fit)

AND try an old Ellipse Fitness Favorite: Party Pepper Salad filled with sweet peppers and beans.