Functional Training

Family Ladder Workout

Start with 10 Jump Squats, Pause, Reset, and Begin again 10 Jump Squats, 9 Double Leg Lowers. Pause, Reset, Begin again 10 Jump Squats, 9 Double Leg Lowers, 8 Pushups. Repeat down the ladder until you get to the 1:00 Cardio exercise

Get creative! Maybe you sprint around the outside of the house or have a race or competition of some kind!

Family TEAM Workout!

Go Solo, or Make Teams!

Grab a deck of cards, pull out the jokers. Each individual or team is assigned a suit. Create a distance to run from start to the full deck of cards, shuffled. Each team or person runs to the deck and chooses a card from the deck. If it’s their suit, they run it back to their start/pile. They run again, or the next team member, to the deck again. If the suit is not theirs they put it in the discard and run back to start before trying again. The first person/team with all 13 cards wins!

Make it harder by changing a rule to run to the deck to be skips, hops, etc.

Family Park/Outdoor Workout

Head to an open area, park or field. Mark 4 corners. Run/walk to corner 1. Perform 20 jumping jacks or tuck jumps. Run/walk to corner 2. Perform 10 pushups or frog hops. Run/walk to corner 3. Perform 20 squats. Perform walking lunges to corner 4/start.

Make it a competition or try to beat your own time by keeping a family record book. Write the date and time each person. Cheer on the participants!

Tabata Workout

The Home Workout Guide You Need!

More people than ever are working out at home whether via live-stream videos or Facetime, pre-recorded videos or just making things up as they go. But there are some things you’ll want to take into account to maximize your home workout efficacy – and safety!

1. Find Your Spot

Find a space with some room to move, good ventilation, and away from distractions. Are you watching a screen to follow along with your workout? Make sure you can see well enough by viewing on a computer screen, Smart TV, or other larger screened device. This is your time!

2. Find Your Time

Even during chaotic times, schedule your workout and don’t break your appointment! Let those around you know that you have an appointment you can’t miss whether in your home or otherwise. It is all too easy to skip a workout when you simply, “get around to it at some point”.

3. Be Prepared

You have your workout planned. Now make sure you are dressed and ready for your workout, have your water ready, and check-in. Check-in with your trainer, your friend, or whomever you are keeping accountability with. If you are self-motivated and can stay accountable with yourself, awesome, but many of us are not! Find your person! This is a really simple, REALLY effective tool.

4. Find Your Equipment

If you’ve always been a gym-person, you haven’t had to worry about at-home equipment. But what if you are temporarily at home or on the road?

Resistance bands and minibands are very cost effective. It is a great idea to have one for the “just in case” times. They can easily be tossed in luggage or in that drawer to not take up extra space.

– If you normally use some kind of assistance for your pushups, use a chair, a counter-top, a wall, or anything secure to elevate your pushup!

**Have Nothing? If you need some “make do” workout equipment, grab some of your reusable cotton tote bags or a duffel bag and fill your weight as needed. The bags can be held like a kettlebell for Turkish get ups, deadlifts, overhead presses, bicep curls, and so much more!
More ideas: canned foods, laundry detergent bottles, ½ and gallon milk jugs filled as needed can make great substitute weights. Get creative and/or ask for help! How to sub equipment, modify movements, etc. ask us!

5. Find Your Footwear

Although in many cases barefoot is the ideal way to train, if you have not worked out barefoot or in minimalist shoes previously, start slow! Use the same training shoes you have been and maybe try 10-minutes of your workout barefoot to see how you feel. This might be a great time to adjust to minimalist footwear, if it’s right for you.

What the “Sitting-Rising” Test Tells You About Your Life Expectancy

In 2012 a research team designed the “sitting-rising” exercise that seemed to predict mortality in those 51 – 80 years old. Over 2000 adults were tested. Essentially it tests strength as well as hip mobility and how it may be related to mortality.

According to the CDC, over 61% of U.S. residents over 65 died from fall-related causes in 2016. Although there are other factors that can come into play, it’s a good reminder that moving well is just as important as other aspects of health/fitness (like heart-health, body composition, muscular strength, bone density, etc).

What is the sitting-rising test?

Sit on the ground and cross your legs. Try standing up from the cross-leg position without touching the ground. Success? Cross your legs the other way and try again!

Start with a score of 10

Subtract 1 point for each time a body part other than your feet touches the ground

Subtract 1 point for placing hand on the knee

Subtract 0.5 points for loss of balance

Interested in other self-tests? Check out this great article!

I took the test…now what?

Bottom line: if you don’t continue to move and put your body through different ranges of mobility, it will go away. Have aches and pains with movement? Try these tips!

1. Start with your feet!

Go barefoot, roll your feet with a tennis ball, walk on a rock mat, give your feet a daily massage/”gymnastics”. Take care of your feet! They are the gateway to your body.

2. Change the way you sit!

When we sit a lot, we tighten our hip flexors which causes the glutes to lengthen and compensate (which can often result in back pain). Our core strength can also be diminished.

Rather than sitting at a computer or on the couch watching TV, try squatting, using a stability ball, using a tall-kneeling position, using a half-kneeling position, sitting back on the heels and/or a combination of all the above.

Offset tight hip flexors and underactive glutes by adding in single leg hip lifts into your exercise routine a number of times per week.

3. Get more mobile!

Are you mobile enough? Another simple test to check your general strength and mobility is to place your feet next to each other and squat down, keeping your heels on the ground. The movement should be simple and pretty effortless.

Today, RIGHT NOW, add some hip mobility into your day with 5-10 reps of “The World’s Greatest Stretch”.

4. Train the postural muscles!

Try sitting on the edge of your chair to keep challenging your body and core strength. Start with 1 minute, and add an extra minute every day for a month. In no time you will be watching an entire episode of your favorite TV show on the edge of your seat with little effort!

THE Core Exercise You Should Be Doing Every Day!

The Plank is a simple, but very effective and EFFICIENT core exercise that helps you build stability and strength throughout your entire body. The primary muscles involved are the erector spinae (muscles around the spine that straighten and rotate the back), rectus abdominis (the “6-pack” muscles), and transverse abdominis (a deep core muscle that stabilizes the low back and core).

The Origin

Some credit Joseph Pilates for the concept of the plank exercise, dating back to the 1920’s! Like standard planks, side planks recruit the transversus abdominis muscles, but also the glutes, obliques, and adductors as the primary muscles.

Why Should You Do It?

In today’s world we are in spinal flexion so often, hunching over our phone or computer – therefore doing loads of “crunches” is unnecessary. Instead utilizing planks encourages stacking the spine, improved posture and can greatly reduce the incidence of back pain.

The plank is a popular exercise in yoga, boxing, and sports because it not only increases strength and stability in the whole body, but it also trains balance and flexibility.

On The Go? No Problem!

Planks are perfect for that workout you need to complete at home or while traveling. No equipment is necessary, and it can be done anywhere! Your job is to make a plank hard to be the most effective. Before increasing your time in a plank make sure to master the form, only then increasing INTENSITY to make sure it’s the safest and most effective plank.

Tips For Improving Your Plank

1. In the pushup position, push up through the shoulders (shoulder protraction) to create stability so the upper back feels rounded arm to arm.

2. Set your wrists under the shoulders (in a low plank our elbows are under the shoulders) and stay there! As we fatigue, we tend to push away from the hands causing unnecessary strain on our shoulders, neck and wrists.

3. To keep your head aligned with your spine, pretend you are giving yourself a double-chin or you are up against a wall and pulling your head back against it.

4. When we train deadlifts, you may have seen a coach place a dowel or pole on a member’s back to have them connect their head, shoulders and tailbone to it while hinging. The same three connections should be seen in a plank.

PUT IT ALL TOGETHER!

Wrists under shoulders, actively drive your hands into the ground, double-chin, push up through the shoulders, squeeze your quads/front of your legs, squeeze/engage your glutes, and build tension in the legs by drawing the legs towards each other.

One final tension boost? Make it a STRICT PLANK by drawing your elbows/hands back as if you are on a rug and pulling it toward you.