Educational

What’s The BIG Deal With “Macros”?

If you’ve been around a bodybuilder, you’ve likely heard them talking about getting their “macros” in. Balancing your macronutrients is honestly just another way to look at food consumption, just like any other approach such as Whole 30, Precision Nutrition’s hand/palm/fist/thumb approach, or any other.

If you haven’t found an approach that works well for you yet, maybe macro dieting is the method right for you! Macro dieting/Flexible Dieting can help with portion control as well as more balanced nutrient intake and paying more attention to processed food intake. As with most approaches, finding the right balance will help with energy levels, cravings, and even quality of sleep and workouts.

What ARE Macros?

The three MACROnutrient categories are carbohydrates, protein, and fat. Speaking in terms of calories, carbohydrates and proteins provide 4 calories per gram and fat provides 9 calories per gram. Is a macro the same as a vitamin or mineral? No, vitamins and minerals are MICROnutrients which are also very important! Your body needs less of them (hence the word micro) but they are vitamins and minerals needed for immune function, blood clotting, bone health, growth, and so much more!

How Much Should I Eat?

Macros are based on your height, weight, age, activity level, and goals. For example, a 150-pound, 5’ 5” female who is moderately active and wants to have a steady weight loss would be around 1700 calories per day broken down to a pretty typical 40/30/30 ratio: 40% carbs at 170g, 30% protein at 124g, and 30% fat at 56g.

You can find your own macro calculator here:
https://healthyeater.com/flexible-dieting-calculator

NOTE: Calculators are not perfect or right for everyone. A more accurate calculation would calculate based only on LEAN tissue since body fat % plays a roll in the energy needs of the body.

Carbohydrates

*Gasp* Carbohydrates ARE needed for energy. Carbohydrates also tend to be where we consume the micronutrients we need in our diet. Whole foods are the best source for carbohydrates because they will pack more fiber. Fiber is the part of carbohydrates that reduce our risk for disease, improve digestion, etc. Optimally, women should obtain at least 35g of fiber per day and men, 48g.

Fat and Protein

Fats give us energy, support cell growth, and aid in the absorption of vitamins and nutrients (our BRAINS are fat-based! So the next time someone calls you “Fathead” perhaps a “Thank You!” is in order).

Mix up the types of fat you eat to get a balance of saturated, polyunsaturated, and monounsaturated fats.

Proteins are the building blocks of our muscle (and most the rest of our body for that matter). A very lean protein is a protein with 1g of fat or less per ounce. Lean protein is 1g-3g per ounce. When looking at your labels, first determine how many ounces you are looking at like a 3-ounce fillet of beef/chicken/pork/fish. If your 3-ounce fillet has 9g or less of fat, you have a lean cut of protein.

Keep in mind that any strict form of eating may not be suitable with a history of disordered eating. Be sure to check with your doctor before starting any major changes in the way you eat and be aware of any interactions with medications. Like most healthy ways of eating, eating your macros will come in the form of eating every 3-4 hours, choosing whole foods, and eating your vegetables! In the end, eat mostly plant-based foods and find the system that works best for your lifestyle and goals, and you will likely see success!

Interested in more reading? Check this out:
https://www.cookinglight.com/eating-smart/macro-diet-counting-macros-weight-loss-better-nutrition

Nutritional Yeast: What It Does For You and How to Cook With It

Nutritional Yeast 101

Nutritional yeast, “NOOCH” for short, is a deactivated yeast that. It is derived from a species of yeast know as Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, which is the same species that Brewer’s yeast and Baker’s yeast are derived from. They differ, HOWEVER, in that brewer’s yeast is grown only on hops and bakers yeast is active, whereas nutritional yeast can be grown on a variety of sources and it is put through a heating and drying process that renders it inactive.

Primarily, nutritional yeast is used as a supplement for those with dietary restrictions to add not only additional flavor to your meal, but also several health benefits along with it.

What’s In It?

It is dairy free, usually gluten free, low in fat and contains no sugar or soy. Nutritional yeast is an EXCELLENT source of vitamins, minerals and high-quality protein. Specifically (per 1/4 cup serving), there are only:

• 60 calories

• 8 grams of protein

• 3 grams of fiber

• Vitamin & minerals (including numerous B Vitamins, Potassium, Calcium and Iron)

Benefits

Nutritional yeast serves as a versatile source of supplementation for those in need of a little something extra in their food due to dietary restrictions.

• It is a complete protein, containing all nine essential amino acids that humans must get from food. One tablespoon contains 2 grams of protein, which makes for an easy solution for vegans needing to add protein to their meals.

• It contains many B vitamins. One tablespoon of nutritional yeast contains 30–180% of the RDI for B vitamins and when fortified, it is especially rich in thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.

• It contains up to 30% of the RDI for trace minerals, such as zinc, selenium, manganese and molybdenum. Trace minerals are involved in gene regulation, metabolism, growth and immunity.

Potential Side Effects

While nutritional yeast is highly beneficial for most, there are some individuals for whom nutritional yeast is NOT suitable for.

Those with IBD, glaucoma, hypertension or a higher risk of gout should avoid using nutritional yeast as it may worsen their symptoms. In large doses, it can cause digestive discomfort or facial flushing due to its high fiber and niacin content, and it may also contain tyramine and MSG, which can trigger headaches in some individuals (note that MSG is only present in nutritional yeast if it has been added during processing or manufacturing). In order to avoid these side effects, you should try adding nutritional yeast into your diet by introducing it slowly and sticking to lower doses to minimize unwanted side effects.

Where Can I Find It?

You can find nutritional yeast in most grocery stores, health food shops as well as online. It comes in the form of flakes or in the form of powder and there are two types of yeast:

• Unfortified: does not contain any added vitamins or minerals. It only contains the vitamins and minerals that are naturally produced by the yeast cells as they grow.
• Fortified: contains synthetic vitamins added during the manufacturing process to boost nutrient content. If vitamins have been added to the yeast, they will be included in the ingredients list.

How To Use It

Nutritional yeast’s flavor can be described as savory, umami or cheesy. It is often used as an ingredient in creamy, dairy-free cheese substitutes and as a topper for foods such as popcorn, pasta, and French fries!

Here are a few quick examples on how to incorporate/substitute it into meals:

• On popcorn as alternative to butter/salt
• In risotto instead of parmesan cheese
• Added to creamy soups
• Added to scrambled eggs or tofu scramble
• Mixed into nut roast or stuffing
• Vegan cheese sauce (recipe here) which can be used in Vegan Mac-N-Cheese!

Taste The Rainbow: A Visual Nutrition Guide

Eating a “rainbow” of fruits and vegetables reduces the risk for chronic disease, by ensuring you are providing your body with all the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and nutrition it needs.

The different colors are made possible different phytochemicals and can be an easy way to visually see what vitamins and minerals fruits and veggies provide. If you tend to eat the same colors all the time, you are likely missing out on certain green, red, white, purple/blue, and/or yellow/orange phytonutrients.

Still Not Convinced?

Generally, when we think of eating protein it’s not a vegetable. Did you know 1 cup of broccoli has almost 6 grams of protein?!!? In addition to being a protein source, broccoli and it’s green friends offer calcium, iron, folate, and B vitamins. Folate, a B vitamin, is important to make DNA and genetic material, especially for pregnant women’s developing babies, and warding off heart disease and depression. So let’s start there shall we?

GREEN

Start by adding a serving of a nutritionally dense vegetable like kale and spinach to check that GREEN phytonutrient box. Leafy greens are generally contain omega-3 fatty acids which are important and sometimes difficult to work your diet. Vitamin K is another great reason to seek out greens.

Make it even simpler by tossing a handful of spinach in your smoothie…you won’t even taste it! I know that sounds like BS – go try it!

ORANGE/YELLOW

ORANGE/YELLOW fruits and vegetables improve your immune system and promote eye health (reduced risk of cataracts and macular degeneration) with their vitamin A and C. Try adding your “orange” colors like orange bell peppers, carrots, yellow summer squash, roasted winter squash and/or fruits like mandarin orange slices to your salads.

RED

Foods with RED phytochemicals have a very protective antioxidant effect. They can can ward off or inhibit tumors in our bodies. Try some red peppers, tomatoes, beets, cherries, apples, watermelon, and more!

BLUE/PURPLE

Like red fruit and vegetables, BLUE/PURPLE foods are plump with antioxidants especially anthocyanin. Berries are a powerhouse when it comes to antioxidants, helping to protect the skin, aid in cardiovascular health, and improve our memory!

Pro Tips

• When shopping, look at your cart. If you find most of your choices are the same one or two colors, swap out a few to increase the colors — and phytonutrients — in your cart.

• 1/2 cup of chopped raw vegetables or fruit makes one serving. Less dense foods, like leafy greens, take up more space, so 1 cup chopped counts as a serving.

• Think in twos when it comes to vegetable/fruit servings. Try to eat two servings in the morning, two in the afternoon, and two at night.

• We have a tremendous amount of access to fresh vegetables this time of year, but keep in mind that frozen vegetables are picked and frozen quickly, thus retaining virtually the same nutrient density as fresh – even though the flavor may be slightly affected.

6 Foods for a Higher Metabolism!

Ready to start a fire?? These foods (and drinks) will not only jumpstart your metabolism, but also offer you other great health and weight management benefits!

1. Cinnamon

Loved by most, but many don’t really know where it comes from other than maybe that it comes from a tree. Cinnamon is made by cutting the stems of cinnamon trees. The inner bark is extracted and the woody parts removed. When it dries, you get that curled wood that you see sold as cinnamon sticks. Cinnamaldehyde is the active ingredient responsible for cinnamon’s ability to boost the metabolism.

In regards to body protective antioxidants, cinnamon wins by a landslide even over foods like garlic and oregano! Cinnamon helps fight insulin resistance (we need insulin to move sugar from our bloodstream to our cells…when resisted, we have too much sugar floating around) and it interferes, in a good way, with how much sugar enters our blood stream in the first place after a meal. Both HUGE factors for weight maintenance and metabolic health.

2. Green Tea

In addition to cancer fighting and anti-inflammatory properties, Green Tea can help boost your metabolism and increase your fat burning rate! It is unclear whether these benefits are attributed to caffeine alone or to Tea specifically. Studies have also shown that drinking Green Tea may improve insulin sensitivity.

Fun Fact: Oolong and Black Tea come from the same plant as Green Tea, the difference simply being how long the leaves are allowed to oxidize which turns them black (Oolong being in the middle of Green and Black Tea). While the antioxidant profile differs, generally the health benefits remain constant from Green to Black Tea.

3. Spicy Peppers

Spicy food heats you up – no doubt about that! But eating spicy peppers (or cayenne pepper) at a meal, for example, burns only about 10 extra calories. However, consuming capsaicin has been shown to reduce overall hunger throughout the day which certainly can help you adhere to your diet! It may also aid in digestive health, and in animal studies it has been shown to reduce blood pressure.

4. Coffee

Coffee can boost your metabolism up to 11% boost with its caffeine, like green tea. It seems to affect/benefit lean people most though AND if you are a regular coffee (vs occasional) drinker you may not see the same affect.

It’s not all “meh” news though…you can still have your coffee and get your protein in! Try an Iced-Mocha Coffee for the hot summer days: mix 1.5 scoops of Ellipse Chocolate Protein Powder with ½ c unsweetened almond milk. Add 1.5 cups iced coffee.

5. Spices

Kind of lumping a few things in here, but spices like ginger and turmeric can help raise your metabolism with their thermogenic effects.

Ginger can increase calorie burn by increasing blood flow and thus body temperature. Granted this increase is relatively small, it can’t hurt to add into your meal rotation. (Quick side note: Ginger can interact with certain medications like Warfarin, an anticoagulant – so refer to your doctor’s recommendation).

Grab some broccoli and sweet peppers and fresh basil at the farmer’s market for this super quick dish; Ginger Basil Chicken And Rice.

6. Coconut Oil

We’ve probably all heard that coconut oil is a good choice when it comes to oils. But why? Coconut oil offers a different effect than other oils by raising the GOOD/HDL cholesterol levels in your blood with its medium chain triglycerides and increase calories burned.

2 TBSP seems to be about the recommended amount per day to help reduce belly fat.

BBQ Side Dishes and Summer Salads!

It is Summer time and BBQ season, so this week we have several recipes for you using the fresh produce you should be able to find at your local markets!

Green Beans

Green beans are in season! Like other legumes, green beans contain high fiber to keep you full longer. 1 cup of green beans has just 44 calories plus offers a good source of vitamin K, C, and folate. Eating green beans fresh or with a quick steam method will retain the most nutrients. Store fresh green beans unwashed in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer for up to 7 days.

Try this marinated bean salad to bring to your next BBQ: it combines green beans, kidney beans, and lima beans (swap out if you are not a lima fan!), tomato, and fresh herbs, olive oil, and lemon juice. That perfect “Fresh” salad for the summer!

Tomatoes

Keep ripe tomatoes on the counter away from sunlight. When the tomatoes become (too) soft, toss in the fridge. Keep in mind at the end of the season that green tomatoes can be placed stem side down in a paper bag to ripen (give it time though, it usually takes a while!). Tomatoes are full of water and fiber as well as a good source of vitamin C, potassium, vitamin K, and folate.

Serve yourself up a simple fresh side dish: 1 chopped cucumber + 1 chopped tomato + olive oil and salt. Delish!

Potato Salad

Going to that BBQ and need a dish to pass? Potato salads can be laden with heavy dressings and little nutrition. Add some extra veg and pull back on the heaviness with this potato salad makeover!

Tri-Colored Pepper Potato Salad uses red potatoes, sweet peppers, onions and a lighter sauce of white wine, chicken broth, lemon juice, garlic, dijon, and salt/pepper! TIP: Make it extra colorful with purple, red, and golden potatoes. You can find a 5# bag of cute little fully washed rainbow baby potatoes at Costco. Just cut in half and you are ready to go!

Berries and Melons

Blueberries and melons are coming into season! Find a local blueberry picking patch by searching Google for “Pick your own blueberries” and local patches will pop up. Blueberries are loaded with fiber and antioxidants (one of the highest antioxidant foods actually) plus low in calories. Melons are also a good addition to your diet with their high-water content, vitamin C and other great nutrients depending on the melon choice.

Bring the best of both worlds together with this Melon Berry Fruit Salad. Combine melons and berries with honey, lime juice, and mint. A perfect summer side dish to bring to your next BBQ/picnic. TIP: Store cut melon for about 3 days. If you find yourself with extra, freeze on a cookie sheet before tossing into a container for easy use.

Carrots

Carrots are coming into season! Did you know baby carrots have a lower nutritional vitamin quantity than full sized carrots? BUT WAIT! Baby carrots are actually a small carrot/carrots not allowed to fully mature, NOT the carrots we typically think of in bags (called manufactured baby carrots).

Bagged “baby” carrots are typically carrots that are grown closer together to have a narrow shaft but grow 8-10 inches long. They are then chopped apart and tumbled. The peels go to compost or are used as cattle feed. These carrots have similar, if not the same, nutritional quantities as their standard counterpart. When baby bagged carrots were first “invented” they were shaved down “ugly” carrots.

Summer Squash

Summer squash includes yellow squash, zucchini, and cute little different squash like the pattypan (looks like a little flying disc with scalloped edges) or ball squashes.

With both green beans and summer squash coming into season, there’s no better combination than the Summer Chicken Sauté from our own blog!

Muscle Prep and Recovery Basics

First off, this article is a follow-up to our Ellipse Movement Basics 101 blog post last month. If you haven’t had a chance to check that out, please do! It is one of the most informative and important articles for those of you who are working out or looking to get started.

We’ve spent a good amount of time talking about various movement patterns. To move better we also need to prepare our bodies and help them recover.

Just as important as the movement itself is getting the muscles healthy enough to progress. Foam rolling increases blood flow, increases the temperature of the muscle, and works out adhesions. After foam rolling, do your body a favor and run through some stretches/movements of areas that cause you problems or anything that a Physical Therapist or Orthopedic Doctor has told you to do.

Use the time in the gym before your workout vs just standing or sitting around waiting to begin! What are the odds that you’ll do specific stretches or movements at home or at any other time? Make it a routine and your body will thank you!

Not sure what stretches/movements will help you the most? Ask your trainer. They can not only answer your questions but likely know areas that could use some TLC based on your form throughout your sessions.

Recovery

Your recovery will also impact your movements and the ability to perform at your highest level. Make sure to get enough shut eye (7-9 hours/night), drink enough water (4-6 cups PLUS, but this varies a lot by body, temperature, and activities), and eat a balanced diet (more vegetables, more vegetables, more vegetables).

Other Tools

In addition to a foam roller, try using a tennis ball for those spots a roller just can’t hit. Need a new approach? Stand near a wall and use the tennis ball and/or foam roller in a standing position to put pressure on the right spot. Use a Theracane for more focused areas or hard to reach areas on the back. On a really sore day, ice your sore muscles for 20 minutes to speed up recovery.

Move better, recover better, and perform better!

Start the Harvest Season Off Right!

The Early Summer Harvest!

Ah summer! Mid-June is when several vegetables are starting to be harvested. Nothing tastes quite as great as freshly harvested veggies! Although many factors are at play, the nutrients and vitamin content of fruits and vegetables start decreasing after they are harvested. In some cases that can be as short as 24 hours and others within a week.

If your produce makes a long trip from a field, to a processing area, to a supermarket, you have already narrowed that window significantly! If you can’t grow your own produce, consider a local farmer’s market or CSA to get your produce from the field to your table in a shorter amount of time to retain the most nutrients. (Check out this past blog post about CSA’s and local markets!)

Depending on the spring weather, typically just coming into season mid-June are: beets, bok choy, broccoli, cabbage, potatoes, scallions, and kohlrabi. You’ll also find lettuce greens, arugula, kale, peas, radishes, and rhubarb are already in (and perhaps almost past) season!

Beets!

Did you know? Swiss chard is a bottomless beet! Standard small beets are best for roasting or steaming. Try grating beets and sautéing in a pan with some butter or olive oil. Use the leaves too like you would kale. Beets can be bagged and stored in your crisper drawer for 7-10 days.

Salad Greens!

Salad greens are high in nutrients and low in calories which make them great if you are watching your diet. There are many varieties of greens so mix and match for a variety of tastes, textures, and nutrients.

PRO TIP: If you are not using your salad greens immediately, after the greens have been washed and dried, line a container with paper towels and loosely place the greens on and cover with a piece of paper towel to absorb excess moisture.

Click here for a ranking of the most nutritious greens. HINT: number one is NOT spinach or kale…and certainly not iceberg lettuce!

Want more? Learn how to construct the Perfect Salad!

Broccoli!

Broccoli heads are the unopened flowers of the broccoli. When stored too long the green head of “buds” start to turn yellow and lose their nutritional value. Do NOT store broccoli in a sealed container or plastic bag. If in a plastic bag, make sure the bag is open or has holes poked in it; it needs to have air flow. It should be misted lightly or unwashed and then wrapped loosely in damp paper towels and refrigerated. Consume within a couple days or 1-week max.

Try this recipe to get more broccoli in your days! Combining zucchini “noodles”, traditional spaghetti, broccoli, peas, and pesto sauce. Toss in some chicken/protein and you’ve got a meal ready to serve! Love zucchini? Double the amount of zucchini and reduce the amount of traditional spaghetti…or fully replace it!

Bok Choy!

Bok Choy is a great source of fiber as a cruciferous vegetable. It also contains healthy amounts of vitamins C, K, and A (beta-carotene). Store bok choy in a zip bag and remove any extra air. Toss it in the crisper and serve within about a week.

Pick up some bok choy and serve it up with this classic Ellipse Ginger Chicken Recipe! This tasty meal combines chicken breast, bok choy, ginger, leeks, orange, lentils and curry!

Kohlrabi

Stock up now! The bulbs do great in the refrigerator for quite some time, but you’ll want to use/process the stems and stalks right away as they will get limp otherwise. Kohlrabi is in the “brassica” family which is the same family as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and brussel sprouts. Kohlrabi stems can be used raw in salads like kale, but more commonly the kohlrabi bulb can be peeled and eaten raw (tastes great with hummus or ranch too!) or shredded into a coleslaw.

Try roasting kohlrabi! It’s fantastic! A simple recipe can be found here.

What are you waiting for?? Go shopping and get to eating!!

What is “Activated Charcoal” Anyway?

What is activated charcoal?

Today, activated charcoal is “trendy” and can be found highlighted in health and beauty products from toothpaste to body wash. It can also be purchased in capsule or powder form that can now be found in many retail stores as well as online. It’s a form of carbon that is porous that allows for chemical reactions and has most commonly been used for water filtration and as a treatment for poisoning. This week we’ll look at how it works, if it’s safe, and more!

Is It Safe?

You might think to yourself, “is it carcinogenic?” No.

This is different than burned food type charcoal or the charcoal lumps you use in your grill (above). Activated charcoal is created from a variety of wood, bamboo and/or coconut shells; which is burned anaerobically; without oxygen. Hot gas is used to convert it into charcoal. Hot air/oxygen is then used to blow out the gases and leave a porous charcoal.

How Does It Work?

Charcoal becomes “Activated” when steam or hot air is used to erode its internal surface. This increases its ability to bind to other things.

Vocab Word! Adsorption – This is when toxins/elements bind to the surface of the charcoal. Activated charcoal has a porous surface that is negatively charged. Positively charged toxins bond to it and it aids them in safely leaving the body. It’s been said that charcoal can attract 100 times its weight in actual toxic material! (according to www.beatcancer.org).

What Are The PROs & CONs?

PRO:

Activated charcoal has been used for years to absorb toxins from drug overdoses and poison ingestion. Some suggest activated charcoal can ease digestion, reduce gas (like beano before a gassy meal), lower cholesterol, prevent/treat stomach bugs and eliminate diarrhea. They have also long been used as water filters. The “extras” in water attach to the porous surface of the charcoal to clean up your water. Just be sure to replace your filters…it’s not just a suggestion! Once the porous surface is filled with toxins, it can’t hold any more and the filter is no longer working.

CON:

Just like activated charcoal can absorb toxins, it can also absorb other things you may not be aware of, like medication. It has been seen to limit the effectiveness of birth control, and some other vitamins/nutrients. In the pros, it was mentioned that activated charcoal can ease diarrhea, but it can also possibly cause vomiting and constipation at high doses.

No matter the dose, be sure to consume plenty of water if you choose to supplement with activated charcoal, and as always – solicit an opinion from your Primary Care Physician!

Summary

Like anything, do your homework and make an informed choice. Science hasn’t had a chance to dive deep into activated charcoal yet to prove its pros and cons outside of poison treatment.

Want to try it out? You can try to using it to whiten your teeth! Check out this link below to learn how to use an old toothbrush and a capsule of activated charcoal – which will absorbs the plaque! Just keep in mind – charcoal is black, so it looks a little funny at first!

https://www.mamanatural.com/charcoal-teeth-whitening/

National Hamburger Day, National Olive Day, and MORE!

This week in addition to Memorial Day we had some very strange national holidays that we thought it’d be fun to talk about and offer some nutritional suggestions with! First let’s talk about the one we are probably all familiar with:

Memorial Day

Today we honor those who died in active military service. By 1890, every former state of the union recognized Memorial Day, but just those that died in the Civil War. This didn’t start to change until after World War I. While remembering the real reasons for today’s holiday, many will kick off the summer and picnic season. Don’t let your goals fall by the wayside.

Give some of your picnic classics, like potato salad, a twist! Instead of a mayo-based potato salad, try swapping out plain Greek yogurt. Check out this link for a great potato salad recipe made with yogurt, mustard, lemon juice, and fresh dill to get that classic flavor.

Want more? Here’s 8 things you might not know about Memorial Day!

National Hamburger Day

Now of course, this plays off Memorial Day nicely as the picnic season has jumped into full gear. Hamburgers CAN be a part of a healthy diet. Consider what parts may derail you, like a huge doughy bun, perhaps a slew of condiments, that slathered cheese, or maybe it’s the side dishes.

Find the biggest offender and make a healthy swap. Small changes can lead to big results. Change out the bun or consider eating it open-faced. Can’t toss the bun quite yet? Try a sprouted grain bun. Looking for something a little new? Check out Smart Baking Company for some low calorie, low carb bun and snack options.

*BONUS*
Here’s a review by our very own Heather Trevarthen:

“First – Buns. I tried the sesame seed buns. I tried a bite just plain. They definitely have a different taste. I wasn’t sure I would love it with a burger so played it safe by toasting it. Toasted, I thought it was a great alternative!

Second – snack cakes. OMG…these are delicious. Low cal, low carb, low glycemic index, and protein from their main ingredient of egg whites! These are light, fluffy, and full of flavor. Loved them. Kids loved them too! I gave them a bite and then hoarded the rest for myself. LOL!”

So, here’s a purchase link that will get you 10% off when used with promo code: EllipseAllouez

If you try them, please let us know your review!

National Senior Health & Fitness Day

Many of us have a “senior” in our lives and all of us want ourselves and our loved ones to age gracefully. Reportedly, 86% of hip fractures occur in men and women 65 and older, and after a hip fracture general life expectancy diminishes. (Source)

Seniors can protect themselves from injury by incorporating good nutrition, aerobic training, strength training, and balance work into their daily life. It doesn’t need to be fancy. Encouraging simple things like balancing on one foot for x amount of time or squatting to a chair (for safety) will help make these movements a part of their routine. Encourage good nutrition by sharing your healthy picnic sides, from this week, to introduce easy nutrition transformations.

National Olive Day

Rejoice olive lovers, olives have a laundry list of health benefits! Olives contain only 4-6% carbs which is almost all fiber. Olives are an unusual fruit (yes a fruit since they grow from a tree and have a pit; they are a stone fruit like a plum) with their high fat content. The fat in olives is heavy in oleic acid which has been shown to decrease inflammation and reduce the risk of heart disease. Go ahead and spread that olive tapenade on your wrap or toss some olives in your next picnic side dish!

It’s Picnic Season!

It’s picnic season and you may be looking for some picnic salads or a dish to pass without sabotaging your nutrition goals with another fruit fluff dessert or mayo laden salad! Do your research and find a couple recipes that are a “Safe bet”. Bring a dish that you know you is a healthy option and load your plate up with that one first and choose wisely among the rest.

Not sure where to start? Give this salad recipe a shot: red potatoes, onions, and sweet peppers tossed with a delicious sauce of apple cider vinegar, white wine, chicken broth, garlic, lemon juice and olive oil. Picnic ready!

For even more search the blog for a bunch of great recipes! Simply search for an ingredient or even the word “salad”. Search for Cabbage and you’ll find a great Kale and Cabbage Slaw recipe: kale + green and red cabbage tossed with a delicious sauce. Yum!

Shake the Afternoon Slump!

During our onboarding process, we have found that many people indicate the termed “afternoon slump”.

You know, that tired feeling like you would just love a quick nap to be able to finish out the day. There is good news! For the most part, this is normal, but there are things to consider and ways to help combat it. This week we’ll chat about afternoon slumps!

Get Some Sunshine!

You might be able to cure this simply by listening to some upbeat music and/or getting out in the sunshine for a few minutes for a quick boost!

Was it my lunch?

Maybe, maybe not. Research has shown that the slump can even happen without having eaten lunch. However, keeping a level glycemic load in the body can help offset a natural afternoon slump. You need a proper balance of carbs, protein, and fats. A high carb lunch can set you up for a quick drive in energy, but you will quickly find the drop that follows it. Also, make sure you stay hydrated! Even a 1.5% drop in hydration can cause drowsiness.

Was it a poor night’s sleep?

Could be! CHRONIC afternoon slumps or general sleepiness could indicate a medical condition (like a metabolic disorder, PCOS, or sleep apnea) or medication side effects. Be sure to check with your doctor if you have chronic fatigue.

Medical conditions aside, a poor night’s sleep can come back to bite you in the afternoon. Adult bodies need 7-9 hours of QUALITY and UNINTERRUPTED sleep to allow it to run through its full recovery process (mentally and physically!). A quick 10-minute power nap can help with that afternoon slump, though. Just make sure it doesn’t turn into a longer nap which can interrupt a normal night’s sleep.

I had a healthy lunch – what’s wrong with me?

You’re human! The human body runs in a circadian rhythm. By nature, the body naturally dips in energy between midnight and daybreak, then again, a smaller dip between 2p and 4p. Just like near bedtime, your core body temperature drops signaling to your brain that it’s time to sleep – a smaller version of that happens midafternoon. This will typically result in a quick drop in energy, alertness, and focus. As you age, the mid-afternoon slump will likely be more noticeable than in younger years.

TIP: Your body associate’s stillness with sleep. Been sitting a long time? Get up and move around!

It’s the afternoon and it hit me! Now what?

Well maybe we should start with what won’t work? A quick sugar high like a Mountain Dew, candy bar, or a triple shot of mocha in your coffee. These will simply exaggerate your energy very briefly before causing an even bigger dip/low point.

Caffeine can certainly offer some aid, remember to try and keep a full day’s caffeine load to 400mg or less.

What else CAN help? A short bout of exercise like going for a walk or jog. Exercise can produce endorphins and release tension which can offset fatigue.

In the end, get a good night’s sleep, eat well, exercise, and listen to your body! Or, go work for the Huffington Post where they offer “The Oasis”…sleep pods for their employees!

I work shift work. What about me?

Night shifts and swing shifts are tough on the body in regard to circadian rhythm (mentioned above). “Afternoon slump” aside, non-traditional job hours still require a good 7-9 hours of sleep each day otherwise you will fall into a sleep-debt mode that needs to be fulfilled as soon as possible to prevent the increased likeliness of disease.

With night shifts, do not delay going to bed when you are tired! The longer you delay, the more alert you will become. Still try to get 7-9 hours of uninterrupted sleep, putting your phone on “do not disturb”.

Some other tricks are to eat a small snack before bed and making sure your sleep environment is quiet, dark, and cool.