Julia’s Story and Transformation!

Julia’s Story and Transformation!

Julia’s Story:

I have been asked several times what am I doing? I have been working out at Ellipse Fitness Allouez for two years. I had seen the promotions to join previously and always thought of checking it out but never acted on it.

They had a promotion for 21 days program and I made the call. The day I signed up was the same day that a dear Aunt … Aunt Delores, my mother’s sister, passed away – September 15, 2017. My fun- loving cousin Kathy, Delores daughter, recently joined Ellipse and now we find time to attend kickboxing sessions together.

Fortunately, being older your memory goes so I don’t really remember much about the first few weeks. Of course, I did feel sore and could not believe how unfit I was. But I surprised myself that when the three-week program ended, I decided to keep going.

There were three reasons why I was able to keep going.

First, the members at the 9:00 a.m. session! They were and are very welcoming and supportive of each other. As I attended other times that is true in the other classes, too.

Second reason, the workout sessions are planned out and each day is different bringing challenges and fun. Kickboxing on Thursday is one of my favorite days.

The third and final reason of course on why many members including myself stay are the trainers. Supportive and nonjudgmental are the best words to describe them. You don’t have to be the best at any exercise and that was true for me. You do need to show up and work the best that you can that day and they will help you on your journey to get stronger and more skilled at the exercises.

I had not exercised much other than walking. My weight went up and down over the years. Growing up on a dairy farm I knew I had some muscles in there someplace from carrying those full pails of milk and throwing around bales of hay. Those years were replaced with desk jobs and less and less activity.

Our family history includes heart disease and diabetes along with my own mother’s passing of Ovarian cancer. I have been blessed with only a few health issues which includes two surgeries on my elbow which has developed into arthritis. So, the time seemed right to be more proactive in my own health journey. And that is what it comes down to is time. What you value is where you will spend your time, which includes the time you have to spend with family, friends, faith, volunteer work, exercise or what you think is important.

Once I got past the three weeks of the program, I found myself going 4 days a week and soon it was 5 and sometimes 6 days. The strength workout days do bring challenges for my arm and Cujo and other trainers are great at finding alternatives that work the same muscles.

Along with planned workout days they also have recipes and nutrition advice for weight loss and health. Ellipse trainers keep updated on what is trending in the fitness industry and are constantly educating members through personal tips at each class as well as on their social media outlets.

Since I started, I have lost 57 pounds and 60.5 inches.

I will admit that when I started, I did say to myself many times – “not sure I can do that exercise.” As the time went on and did what I could I began to feel more skilled to try it and continue to add more repetitions as well as weight that I was lifting. I enjoy and feel strong when I do pushups, Trx rows and rope waves.

The 100-workout challenge is a challenge to encourage members to get in the gym the second half of the year. The challenge starts July 1 and ends December 31. Making time to get to class has been a priority in my journey so was pleased to tie with Angie to reach that goal by October 30, 2018.

Another milestone was the four-hour fitness marathon that I completed as part of the Victory over Violence event this past March. Who knew I could or would want to exercise for that long of a timeframe? But I did!

I recently had lunch with a friend that congratulated me on my health accomplishments. She shared this thought with me … “what if you had not done this at this point in your life? Wonder what health issue or illness you averted by making yourself and your health a priority?” Something for all of us to think about.

If you have been on the lookout for a gym or fitness place that can help you reach your health goals and also a place to challenge you and have fun – Ellipse Fitness Allouez is that place. I am not an at home workout person and needed to go to a location for classes, people and motivation.

I am grateful to have found Cujo, Heather, Christine, Bry, Erin, Anna and Corrin. The trainer that I work the most with is Cujo and I am not sure I would have gotten this far without his nonjudgmental approach to fitness and his constant planning alternatives for members who need that to get started or to rehab from a medical injury. That allowed me to say “I can do that” and before I knew it, I was doing more complex moves.

I don’t think I have done anything extra ordinary so am pleasantly surprised that I am an inspiration in my journey. As Cujo and others can attest to I think this is taking me longer to get “there” than I thought it would. What I have found is that even with the ups and downs this is the first time I am confident of keeping the weight off and will continue on getting healthier.

Sugar: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

It’s not hard to find SUGAR. It’s in a slew of food and drink products and most often can be found in packaged foods with ingredients ending in the letters -ose like glucose, maltose, dextrose, lactose, fructose, sucrose; it’s all sugar.

Is one better than the other? In the end, all sugars have 4 calories per gram. The differences comes down to any notable nutrients/antioxidants and HOW they affect the body/glycemic load. This week we’re looking a little deeper at what makes each type of sugar different.

Sucrose

Common table sugar (as pictured above). Sucrose contains 50% glucose and 50% fructose. We’ll break each of these down further later on. Sucrose tastes sweeter than glucose but not as sweet as fructose.

Glucose

Glucose comes from the Greek word for “sweet” and contains 1 glucose molecule. Glucose syrup is typically made from breaking down the starch in corn or wheat. Glucose syrup isn’t overly sweet and thus is typically used along with other sweeteners and helps extend the shelf life of products like ice cream [from crystalizing]. Glucose can be metabolized throughout our body, unlike fructose that can only be metabolized by the liver.

Fructose

Although FRUIT is high in fructose, it’s difficult to get excessive amounts from fruit, plus fruit is also very high in FIBER which is nature’s way of balancing it out. Eat fruit, skip the fruit juice (which takes out the fiber)!

If you are a label-reader then you surely have seen “High Fructose Corn Syrup” as a common ingredient that seems to pervade nearly every product on the shelf from ketchup to cookies to cereal. This is concerning because not only is a high intake of fructose bad for your waistline, but it can increase your risk of all sorts of diseases from heart disease to diabetes and even some types of cancer. Check out this link below for a DIY tutorial and you can see first-hand the process involved!
http://www.diyhfcs.mayaweinstein.com/

Maltose

Maltose is made of 2 glucose molecules. Maltose can be found in starchy grains, vegetables, and some fruit. When grains are sprouted in water and then dried, the enzymes in the grains release maltose. You can find it in brewing stores since it is an important part of brewing beer and whiskey. Maltose can also be sold as crystals or syrup, for baking or sweetener.

“Malted” cereals use malted grains to create the natural sweetness. The calories in maltose is equivalent to other sugars, but the potential benefit of maltose over other sugars is that it does not contain any fructose, which can be more harmful in large quantities.

Check out this video to see how malt syrup can be made!

Brown Rice Syrup

Similar to maltose, this is made by soaking, fermenting, and boiling down rice. Brown rice syrup contains 45% maltose (2 glucose molecules), 3% glucose (1 glucose molecule), and 52% maltotriose (3 glucose molecules). This actually puts the glycemic index HIGHER than table sugar. ALSO, arsenic is a toxic chemical known to be found in rice. Boiling rice down into a syrup compounds the amount of potential arsenic. Even though scientific research is limited, choosing fewer items with brown rice syrup may be in your best interest.

Molasses

This syrup is boiled down from refined raw cane sugar or sugar beet juice. The crystals from the boiling process are removed, leaving molasses.

FYI: Blackstrap molasses is when the syrup has been boiled a THIRD time. Each boiling of a sugar produces a different type of molasses. Molasses may be seen as slightly better than “table sugar” since it does contains some nutrients and antioxidants, but essentially…sugar is sugar.

Well alright, there was a lot more “Bad” and “Ugly” than there was good, but at least now you are equipped with knowledge of these different types of sugars and can prepare yourself to read those labels and make more educated decisions!

It’s ALL About CORE! 6 Things You Need To Know!

What is the purpose of the core? Oh there are many, many essential functions!

Stabilization

Maybe the most common function of the core is to take excess load off the spine and to transfer force between the upper and lower body. When you throw a ball for instance, you have your core to thank! Back pain? Check in with your core muscles! Gastrointestinal problems? Your core even plays a role in your bowel movements!

Balance

Core muscles support your skeleton for balance (and for your ability to “Catch” yourself when falling). Try to really apply your core stability (hollow body hold tension) to your strength moves; squat, deadlifts, pushups, planks, and see the difference! Especially exercises standing on one leg. Just TRY to shut off your core muscles and you are probably going down!

Rotation

Core also helps with rotation and even more often, ANTI-rotation…Refer up to stabilizing in order to resist the movement. Core stabilizers include the pelvic floor, transversus abdominis (creates pressure and provides the most stability during dynamic movements), multifidus (small muscles in your back), erector spinae (think back extensions), obliques (moving side to side and rotation), AND the diaphragm.

Posture

Weakness in the CORE can change your posture – for the worse – therefore affecting the strength of your hips and ultimately knees and/or back. For example, in an abdominal exercise such as bicycles, your pelvis should NOT be moving. If it is, then you may not ready for that move and should take a step back to keeping the hips on the ground while just lifting the opposite knee/arm without speed or momentum.

Breathing

The diaphragm is an extremely important core muscle that contracts and extends toward the abdomen when we inhale and connects to the lower six ribs of our ribcage. When you inhale, your diaphragm flattens allowing the most air into your lungs. When it contracts it pushes everything else out of the way (and when your belly expands this is called belly breathing).

Try belly breathing – lie on the floor on your back. Legs bent or extended on the ground. Take a deep breath and inhale deeply allowing your belly to rise. As you exhale every last breath, let your belly draw in toward the ground. Practice this until it becomes automatic. When you apply it to your exercises, you’ll be surprised how much more stable and effective you are!

Now What? Put This In Action!

Not sure where to start?

Step 1: Learn spinal stability and breathing properly. Back or neck still hurt during movements? Start with pelvic tilts and increase the endurance/time of the hold.

Step 2: Once mastered, start adding complexity such as increased levers (hollow body hold), followed by slow movement (deadbugs) with levers.

Step 3: Add load/complexity (i.e. hold a plank and add alternating leg lifts).

Step 4: Add rotation (i.e. Soft Toss Medicine Ball shot put throw)

Step 5: Add dynamic movement (Step back lunge with sandbag t-spine rotation)

Is it Self-Care? Self-Comfort? or Self-Indulgence?

Self-care

It’s a buzz word of sorts today, but what is it?

Self-care is about recognizing the needs of your mind, body, and spirit and feeding those needs through physical, mental, and emotional health. Self-care is individual, as it is whatever takes you closer to your goals. For some, self-care might mean getting in their 64-ounces of water a day to ensure they don’t get a migraine. For others it might be finding a quiet place to be by themselves each day to simply hear their own thoughts for 10-15 minutes. Maybeeee…it’s as simple as eating slowly and truly tasting your food!

There are different areas of self-care, and it goes beyond physical:

Physical

Hello! Fitness! But also, getting enough sleep and recovery.

Emotional

How do you deal with stress? How do you show love to yourself?

Social

How do you form meaningful connections with those around you? How do you set appropriate boundaries in your relationships?

Intellectual

When do you make time to try new things or to challenge your brain? Human beings thrive off of novelty! It is important to engage your intellect in new and different ways.

Spiritual

What gives you a sense of purpose? How do you tap into your deepest motivation and gain satisfaction in your life?

Self-Care vs Self-Indulgence

Self-care needs to be separated from self-comfort and self-indulgence. Self-comfort might be choices that do NOT move you forward, or toward your goal, but do make you feel better in the moment…such as skipping your workout or to have “just one more” drink with your coworkers.

Self-indulgence would be going “all in” on self-comfort which often turns into a downward spiral. Instead of that comforting glass of wine, it turns into most or all of a bottle. Wake up groggy, skip morning workout, give into cravings and eat crappy breakfast of simple carbohydrates and regret the rest of your day.

Make sure to distinguish between self-care (good!) vs self-comfort (be careful) vs self-indulgent (destructive).

Ask yourself a few questions to determine if your choices are self-care or self-comfort/indulgent.

1) Does this choice move me closer to my goal/desired outcome?
2) What choices provide self-comfort but just aren’t worth it? Or which ones are?
3) Which choices are probably more self-indulgent and how can I reframe that to be self-care?

Let’s Recap

We’ve heard self-care with regards to scheduling a massage, your workout, etc, but let’s think out of the box for a moment.

Are you always time crunched?

1) Maybe spend the few extra dollars to order your groceries online and let a service like Shipt deliver your groceries or use your free Target/Amazon shipping options to save yourself that time running errands.
2) Are you a part of the “bargain basement” flight deals through Frontier and other airlines? Maybe self-care is literally hopping on a plane for a cheap weekend getaway! It doesn’t always have to be exotic, sometimes “anywhere but here” is just about letting go of your daily responsibilities for a couple days.
3) Or, if you have kids, maybe it’s time to set some family house rules and everyone share in their part of cleaning, organizing, laundry, etc. Did I hear chore chart? Quit doing everything yourself!

Make the Most of The Late Summer Harvest!

Summer is almost over but there’s still plenty of vegetables that are still being harvested or still need to be harvested. Late Summer Harvests include vegetables like onions, potatoes, garlic, shallots, leeks, cabbages, celery, eggplant, peppers, pumpkins and winter squash! This week we will be talking about recipes to go with the late summer harvest!

Celery

Grab some celery from your local farmer’s market or CSA and appreciate it since celery can be a little tough to grow…it isn’t greatly tolerant to heat or cold or drought. This finicky plant is great for cooking, salads, and more though. Plus, it boasts wonderful health benefits like reducing inflammation, aiding in digestion, and helping to alkalize our often highly acid diets.

Bell Peppers

Harvested in late summer, they are a member of the nightshade family which is the same family as tomatoes, eggplant, and potatoes (but not sweet potatoes!). Some people have sensitivities to nightshade produce that may experience gas, joint inflammation, headaches, and more. BUT, if you don’t have sensitivities they are also high in vitamins and antioxidants including a boatload of vitamin C. Red peppers pack the most nutrition since they have been on the vine the longest. TIP: All bell peppers start out green then change to yellow or orange before ripening to red.

Leeks

Leek’s are good at holding onto grit, so let’s talk prep! The tops will look darker than the rest. Cut the darkest part off and compost those or save for soup stock. Next cut off root (the fuzzy stuff at the bottom). The stem can be cut into rings or chiffonade (thin strips). Rinse the cuttings in a colander to get any grit out. TIP: Like onions and garlic let leeks sit for at least 5 minutes after cutting and before cooking.
Leeks can be tossed into pot roast, added to a pan of roasted vegetables, tossed into soups, added to a green salad, or tossed with cooked green beans to add a new flavor. Check out this link for a Salmon and Leek Dish!

Eggplant

A relative of the tomato, can be healthy when prepped in less “heavy” ways than the traditional eggplant parmesan. Eggplant is a non-starchy vegetable that can be grilled, roasted, stewed, breaded, or sautéed and can be used in many different types of recipes. Often used as a meat substitute in dishes like lasagna, it packs a meaty texture with its higher fiber content. Not sure where to start? Try this grilled eggplant and yogurt dip recipe! Just serve with pita chips or vegetables and you’re all set for your next dish to pass!

Garlic

Garlic is a perennial that grows in spring and is ready for harvest in the late summer. It is ready for harvest when the bottom two leaves turn brown. Garlic needs to be cured/dried out for about 2 weeks (like on a covered porch) before using. Rumor has it, the number of leaves on the stem will tell you how many cloves of garlic you will have! Garlic has a laundry list of health benefits, so make sure to include it in your regular recipes. Not used to using raw garlic? Just buy a garlic press and it is easier than you can imagine to mince your own garlic. BONUS: Although you probably run into vampires, garlic repels mosquitoes too!

Squash

If you are not a squash fan, odds are you just haven’t tried the right one or had it prepared in your tastes! Squash come in many varieties, textures, and flavors. Load up on different winter squash at your local farmer’s market since they can store for months in a cool dry area. Spaghetti squash are super easy to grow and can be microwaved or baked to produce strings/”noodles” that are tasty just with a little butter and salt, combined with spaghetti sauce, or added into a variety of recipes. Other squash can be roasted, pureed for sauces, and even cubed and frozen for later use. Follow this link for a Squash Breakdown!