Nutritional Yeast: What It Does For You and How to Cook With It

Nutritional Yeast: What It Does For You and How to Cook With It

Nutritional Yeast 101

Nutritional yeast, “NOOCH” for short, is a deactivated yeast that. It is derived from a species of yeast know as Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, which is the same species that Brewer’s yeast and Baker’s yeast are derived from. They differ, HOWEVER, in that brewer’s yeast is grown only on hops and bakers yeast is active, whereas nutritional yeast can be grown on a variety of sources and it is put through a heating and drying process that renders it inactive.

Primarily, nutritional yeast is used as a supplement for those with dietary restrictions to add not only additional flavor to your meal, but also several health benefits along with it.

What’s In It?

It is dairy free, usually gluten free, low in fat and contains no sugar or soy. Nutritional yeast is an EXCELLENT source of vitamins, minerals and high-quality protein. Specifically (per 1/4 cup serving), there are only:

• 60 calories

• 8 grams of protein

• 3 grams of fiber

• Vitamin & minerals (including numerous B Vitamins, Potassium, Calcium and Iron)

Benefits

Nutritional yeast serves as a versatile source of supplementation for those in need of a little something extra in their food due to dietary restrictions.

• It is a complete protein, containing all nine essential amino acids that humans must get from food. One tablespoon contains 2 grams of protein, which makes for an easy solution for vegans needing to add protein to their meals.

• It contains many B vitamins. One tablespoon of nutritional yeast contains 30–180% of the RDI for B vitamins and when fortified, it is especially rich in thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.

• It contains up to 30% of the RDI for trace minerals, such as zinc, selenium, manganese and molybdenum. Trace minerals are involved in gene regulation, metabolism, growth and immunity.

Potential Side Effects

While nutritional yeast is highly beneficial for most, there are some individuals for whom nutritional yeast is NOT suitable for.

Those with IBD, glaucoma, hypertension or a higher risk of gout should avoid using nutritional yeast as it may worsen their symptoms. In large doses, it can cause digestive discomfort or facial flushing due to its high fiber and niacin content, and it may also contain tyramine and MSG, which can trigger headaches in some individuals (note that MSG is only present in nutritional yeast if it has been added during processing or manufacturing). In order to avoid these side effects, you should try adding nutritional yeast into your diet by introducing it slowly and sticking to lower doses to minimize unwanted side effects.

Where Can I Find It?

You can find nutritional yeast in most grocery stores, health food shops as well as online. It comes in the form of flakes or in the form of powder and there are two types of yeast:

• Unfortified: does not contain any added vitamins or minerals. It only contains the vitamins and minerals that are naturally produced by the yeast cells as they grow.
• Fortified: contains synthetic vitamins added during the manufacturing process to boost nutrient content. If vitamins have been added to the yeast, they will be included in the ingredients list.

How To Use It

Nutritional yeast’s flavor can be described as savory, umami or cheesy. It is often used as an ingredient in creamy, dairy-free cheese substitutes and as a topper for foods such as popcorn, pasta, and French fries!

Here are a few quick examples on how to incorporate/substitute it into meals:

• On popcorn as alternative to butter/salt
• In risotto instead of parmesan cheese
• Added to creamy soups
• Added to scrambled eggs or tofu scramble
• Mixed into nut roast or stuffing
• Vegan cheese sauce (recipe here) which can be used in Vegan Mac-N-Cheese!

Taste The Rainbow: A Visual Nutrition Guide

Eating a “rainbow” of fruits and vegetables reduces the risk for chronic disease, by ensuring you are providing your body with all the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and nutrition it needs.

The different colors are made possible different phytochemicals and can be an easy way to visually see what vitamins and minerals fruits and veggies provide. If you tend to eat the same colors all the time, you are likely missing out on certain green, red, white, purple/blue, and/or yellow/orange phytonutrients.

Still Not Convinced?

Generally, when we think of eating protein it’s not a vegetable. Did you know 1 cup of broccoli has almost 6 grams of protein?!!? In addition to being a protein source, broccoli and it’s green friends offer calcium, iron, folate, and B vitamins. Folate, a B vitamin, is important to make DNA and genetic material, especially for pregnant women’s developing babies, and warding off heart disease and depression. So let’s start there shall we?

GREEN

Start by adding a serving of a nutritionally dense vegetable like kale and spinach to check that GREEN phytonutrient box. Leafy greens are generally contain omega-3 fatty acids which are important and sometimes difficult to work your diet. Vitamin K is another great reason to seek out greens.

Make it even simpler by tossing a handful of spinach in your smoothie…you won’t even taste it! I know that sounds like BS – go try it!

ORANGE/YELLOW

ORANGE/YELLOW fruits and vegetables improve your immune system and promote eye health (reduced risk of cataracts and macular degeneration) with their vitamin A and C. Try adding your “orange” colors like orange bell peppers, carrots, yellow summer squash, roasted winter squash and/or fruits like mandarin orange slices to your salads.

RED

Foods with RED phytochemicals have a very protective antioxidant effect. They can can ward off or inhibit tumors in our bodies. Try some red peppers, tomatoes, beets, cherries, apples, watermelon, and more!

BLUE/PURPLE

Like red fruit and vegetables, BLUE/PURPLE foods are plump with antioxidants especially anthocyanin. Berries are a powerhouse when it comes to antioxidants, helping to protect the skin, aid in cardiovascular health, and improve our memory!

Pro Tips

• When shopping, look at your cart. If you find most of your choices are the same one or two colors, swap out a few to increase the colors — and phytonutrients — in your cart.

• 1/2 cup of chopped raw vegetables or fruit makes one serving. Less dense foods, like leafy greens, take up more space, so 1 cup chopped counts as a serving.

• Think in twos when it comes to vegetable/fruit servings. Try to eat two servings in the morning, two in the afternoon, and two at night.

• We have a tremendous amount of access to fresh vegetables this time of year, but keep in mind that frozen vegetables are picked and frozen quickly, thus retaining virtually the same nutrient density as fresh – even though the flavor may be slightly affected.

6 Foods for a Higher Metabolism!

Ready to start a fire?? These foods (and drinks) will not only jumpstart your metabolism, but also offer you other great health and weight management benefits!

1. Cinnamon

Loved by most, but many don’t really know where it comes from other than maybe that it comes from a tree. Cinnamon is made by cutting the stems of cinnamon trees. The inner bark is extracted and the woody parts removed. When it dries, you get that curled wood that you see sold as cinnamon sticks. Cinnamaldehyde is the active ingredient responsible for cinnamon’s ability to boost the metabolism.

In regards to body protective antioxidants, cinnamon wins by a landslide even over foods like garlic and oregano! Cinnamon helps fight insulin resistance (we need insulin to move sugar from our bloodstream to our cells…when resisted, we have too much sugar floating around) and it interferes, in a good way, with how much sugar enters our blood stream in the first place after a meal. Both HUGE factors for weight maintenance and metabolic health.

2. Green Tea

In addition to cancer fighting and anti-inflammatory properties, Green Tea can help boost your metabolism and increase your fat burning rate! It is unclear whether these benefits are attributed to caffeine alone or to Tea specifically. Studies have also shown that drinking Green Tea may improve insulin sensitivity.

Fun Fact: Oolong and Black Tea come from the same plant as Green Tea, the difference simply being how long the leaves are allowed to oxidize which turns them black (Oolong being in the middle of Green and Black Tea). While the antioxidant profile differs, generally the health benefits remain constant from Green to Black Tea.

3. Spicy Peppers

Spicy food heats you up – no doubt about that! But eating spicy peppers (or cayenne pepper) at a meal, for example, burns only about 10 extra calories. However, consuming capsaicin has been shown to reduce overall hunger throughout the day which certainly can help you adhere to your diet! It may also aid in digestive health, and in animal studies it has been shown to reduce blood pressure.

4. Coffee

Coffee can boost your metabolism up to 11% boost with its caffeine, like green tea. It seems to affect/benefit lean people most though AND if you are a regular coffee (vs occasional) drinker you may not see the same affect.

It’s not all “meh” news though…you can still have your coffee and get your protein in! Try an Iced-Mocha Coffee for the hot summer days: mix 1.5 scoops of Ellipse Chocolate Protein Powder with ½ c unsweetened almond milk. Add 1.5 cups iced coffee.

5. Spices

Kind of lumping a few things in here, but spices like ginger and turmeric can help raise your metabolism with their thermogenic effects.

Ginger can increase calorie burn by increasing blood flow and thus body temperature. Granted this increase is relatively small, it can’t hurt to add into your meal rotation. (Quick side note: Ginger can interact with certain medications like Warfarin, an anticoagulant – so refer to your doctor’s recommendation).

Grab some broccoli and sweet peppers and fresh basil at the farmer’s market for this super quick dish; Ginger Basil Chicken And Rice.

6. Coconut Oil

We’ve probably all heard that coconut oil is a good choice when it comes to oils. But why? Coconut oil offers a different effect than other oils by raising the GOOD/HDL cholesterol levels in your blood with its medium chain triglycerides and increase calories burned.

2 TBSP seems to be about the recommended amount per day to help reduce belly fat.

BBQ Side Dishes and Summer Salads!

It is Summer time and BBQ season, so this week we have several recipes for you using the fresh produce you should be able to find at your local markets!

Green Beans

Green beans are in season! Like other legumes, green beans contain high fiber to keep you full longer. 1 cup of green beans has just 44 calories plus offers a good source of vitamin K, C, and folate. Eating green beans fresh or with a quick steam method will retain the most nutrients. Store fresh green beans unwashed in a plastic bag in your crisper drawer for up to 7 days.

Try this marinated bean salad to bring to your next BBQ: it combines green beans, kidney beans, and lima beans (swap out if you are not a lima fan!), tomato, and fresh herbs, olive oil, and lemon juice. That perfect “Fresh” salad for the summer!

Tomatoes

Keep ripe tomatoes on the counter away from sunlight. When the tomatoes become (too) soft, toss in the fridge. Keep in mind at the end of the season that green tomatoes can be placed stem side down in a paper bag to ripen (give it time though, it usually takes a while!). Tomatoes are full of water and fiber as well as a good source of vitamin C, potassium, vitamin K, and folate.

Serve yourself up a simple fresh side dish: 1 chopped cucumber + 1 chopped tomato + olive oil and salt. Delish!

Potato Salad

Going to that BBQ and need a dish to pass? Potato salads can be laden with heavy dressings and little nutrition. Add some extra veg and pull back on the heaviness with this potato salad makeover!

Tri-Colored Pepper Potato Salad uses red potatoes, sweet peppers, onions and a lighter sauce of white wine, chicken broth, lemon juice, garlic, dijon, and salt/pepper! TIP: Make it extra colorful with purple, red, and golden potatoes. You can find a 5# bag of cute little fully washed rainbow baby potatoes at Costco. Just cut in half and you are ready to go!

Berries and Melons

Blueberries and melons are coming into season! Find a local blueberry picking patch by searching Google for “Pick your own blueberries” and local patches will pop up. Blueberries are loaded with fiber and antioxidants (one of the highest antioxidant foods actually) plus low in calories. Melons are also a good addition to your diet with their high-water content, vitamin C and other great nutrients depending on the melon choice.

Bring the best of both worlds together with this Melon Berry Fruit Salad. Combine melons and berries with honey, lime juice, and mint. A perfect summer side dish to bring to your next BBQ/picnic. TIP: Store cut melon for about 3 days. If you find yourself with extra, freeze on a cookie sheet before tossing into a container for easy use.

Carrots

Carrots are coming into season! Did you know baby carrots have a lower nutritional vitamin quantity than full sized carrots? BUT WAIT! Baby carrots are actually a small carrot/carrots not allowed to fully mature, NOT the carrots we typically think of in bags (called manufactured baby carrots).

Bagged “baby” carrots are typically carrots that are grown closer together to have a narrow shaft but grow 8-10 inches long. They are then chopped apart and tumbled. The peels go to compost or are used as cattle feed. These carrots have similar, if not the same, nutritional quantities as their standard counterpart. When baby bagged carrots were first “invented” they were shaved down “ugly” carrots.

Summer Squash

Summer squash includes yellow squash, zucchini, and cute little different squash like the pattypan (looks like a little flying disc with scalloped edges) or ball squashes.

With both green beans and summer squash coming into season, there’s no better combination than the Summer Chicken Sauté from our own blog!