Is it Keto Fever or Keto Flu?

Is it Keto Fever or Keto Flu?

A few weeks ago, we talked about IF (Intermittent Fasting). The Keto Diet (AKA Ketogenic Diet) is another way of eating that has been around for a while now, though more recently it is starting to become a bit of a craze.

Keto refers to a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet, which forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates as the primary fuel source. A ketogenic diet is/was primarily implemented to treat difficult-to-control epilepsy in children. It was first tested at a Mayo Clinic in the 1920s.

A keto meal may look something like this:

Typical keto-friendly food choices are things like seafood, low-carb vegetables (non-starchy), cheese, avocados, beef, poultry, eggs, coconut oil, olive oil, plain Greek yogurt, cottage cheese (other dairy typically has too many carbs), nuts/seeds, butter, olives, and black coffee/tea.

How does Keto vary from other ways of eating?

Keto

60-75% Fat

15-30% Protein

5-10% Carbs

Mediterranean

~35% Fat

~25% Protein

~50% Carbs

Paleo

~40% Fat

~40% Protein

~20% Carbs

The Ketogenic Diet is about trying to get into ketosis

It can take anywhere from 2-7 days for the body to enter ketosis depending on the person. This happens when the body doesn’t have enough carbohydrates for energy and uses up the glucose storage. During ketosis, the body starts making ketones, which happens through the oxidation/burning of stored fat.

I want to try the Keto Diet. What can I expect?

With any major diet change, there is generally an adjustment period for the body, however it does seem that this transition is a little more severe with Keto than many diets. During the first week you may experience IBS like symptoms and tiredness. The lack of quick energy from carbohydrates causes the tiredness and has been coined the “keto flu”. Other symptoms can include lightheadedness, nausea, mental fog, cramps, headaches, bad breath and diarrhea. Some of this may be due to reduced fiber and insufficient micronutrients, so it’s important to be aware that you’re doing what you can to fill those gaps.

On the plus side, people often find they can lose weight because healthy fats and lean proteins will keep you more satiated, so eating less is a natural side effect. Also, fats and protein have a higher thermic effect meaning it takes your body more energy/calories just to break the food down.

That sounds like a lot of symptoms, is it worth it?

Frankly, people do often report success. Many see results on the scale rather quickly because when you eat more carbs your body retains fluid. This is one reason why weight comes off quickly with keto initially. Results can continue for a while, but it should be noted that in the vast majority cases people report not being able to stick with it long term.

What else should I know?

Unfortunately, and similar to the “eat less and exercise more” mentality, muscle loss often accompanies the relatively quick weight loss. This can be misleading if the scale is your only source of measurement. Make sure to check with your doctor before beginning any nutrition regimen, but in particular with keto, heart and kidney damage has been observed due to low electrolyte levels (sodium, magnesium, potassium). Keto is not recommended for those with high blood pressure or diabetes. Keto can cause more calcium to be lost in the urine, which can lead to a decrease in bone density over time and increased risk of osteoporosis.

The summary: As with any way of eating, everyone is different, and results will vary depending on your body. This short-term fix may be right for some, but not everyone.

Ellipse Fitness does not endorse the Ketogenic Diet, nor do we view it as a sustainable approach to nutrition, check out these other great blog articles for more of our philosophy on how to make changes that will last you a lifetime!

Ellipse Fitness “Nutrition” Blog Posts

Free Radicals, Your Health and How to Manage!

Free Radicals

Straight from Miriam Webster: an especially reactive atom or group of atoms that has one or more unpaired electrons; especially : one that is produced in the body by natural biological processes or introduced from an outside source (such as tobacco smoke, toxins, or pollutants) and that can damage cells, proteins, and DNA by altering their chemical structure.

BORING…

But the important words are ESPECIALLY REACTIVE. Free radicals are desperately seeking out an electron pair – and the WILL get it one way or another. So how do we handle free radicals in our body, and where do they come from?

Free radicals are the main reason behind the recommendations for increasing foods rich in antioxidants such as blackberries, blueberries, goji, etc. in your daily diet. These foods essentially pick up high numbers of free radicals from your body when being digested, but that’s not the only way!

To quote Dr. Carol Davis (Professor Emerita – University of Miami Miller School of Medicine): “Over time, free radicals build up in our bodies. In order for them to become stable, the radicals must find an electron to “connect” themselves to. Where are these electrons then? Beyond the sources found in certain foods, vitamins, etc, we have an abundant source of electrons right beneath us in the earth. If we fail to connect ourselves with these sources, free radicals attack our healthy tissue to rob the cells of their electrons. The result? A high potential for infection and inflammation, among other ailments.”

Earthing?

From a scientific perspective, the idea is that the earth has a mild negative charge to it. Over time, especially in modern life, our bodies build up a positive charge. Direct contact with the earth can even out this positive charge and return the body to a neutral state.

Many people don’t have this contact with the earth anymore, and some experts wonder if this is a contributor to the many rising health problems we face today. As a population, we wear rubber shoes and live indoors. In theory, many of us could go years without directly touching the earth at all, or even being in direct sunlight!

Antioxidants

Vitamin E and Vitamin C are great antioxidant sources, and can be found in high quantities in foods like nuts, seeds, fish oils (vitamin E), citrus, kale, strawberries, green peppers, etc (vitamin C).

Antioxidants are the polar opposite of free radicals and are especially adept at neutralizing these otherwise harmful byproducts.

Where do they come from?

While not much is known for sure about free radicals’ effects on the body, scientists have theorized that they may contribute to everything from wrinkles/aging signs to atherosclerosis to Alzheimer’s Disease!

While free radicals do occur due to natural body processes, high levels of free radicals are generally associated with people living in highly polluted areas, people who eat fried foods and/or trans fats, people who smoke cigarettes, or people exposed to pesticides.

Interesting Fact: “Weekend Warriors” (as opposed to people who exercise consistently) generate far more free radicals during endurance exercise. Consider a more consistent approach to conditioning which allows your body to manage the stress and not become overwhelmed by the unusual strain.

Stir Fry: Quick and Easy Healthy Cooking!

Stir Fry is a Chinese technique of cooking in a small amount of oil, over high heat, in a bowl-shaped pan (wok) while being stirred. Stir fry can be a great component of healthy eating since it usually contains lots of veggies and lean protein. The stir fry technique allows veggies to retain their color, crunch, and most importantly nutrients!

Step 1: Choose Your Protein, Seasonings and Veggies

This is the foundation of all stir fry, and a fantastic base for healthy eating! Below you’ll see we’ve got beef, chicken, and even veggie stir fry with chickpeas and snow peas for a protein boost!

Step 2: Prep Your Ingredients

Any given recipe uses about a pound of protein, 1 tablespoon of aromatics, and 4 cups of vegetables. Stir fry comes together quickly, so you need all of your ingredients chopped and ready to go before you begin cooking.
TIP: Consider buying pre-chopped onions, matchstick carrots, etc if you are strapped for time!

Step 3: Make Your Sauce

Sauce…maybe the biggest factor between eating and dining! A basic stir fry sauce would include garlic, soy sauce, rice vinegar, brown sugar/honey, stock/water, and cornstarch. Get creative! Just make your own whenever possible because pre-packaged sauce often comes with unsavory ingredients.
TIP: Cook up a huge batch of brown rice when you have extra time and freeze it in storage bags. If you whip together a last minute stir-fry, pull out of the freezer, cut open the bag and microwave covered for about 5 minutes.

Step 4: Time to Stir Fry

Cook your protein for a few minutes alone until browned and set aside (does not have to be cooked through). Add oil, aromatics, then veggies until cooked, but crunchy. Recombine, add sauce and simmer a few minutes. Voila!
TIP: Aromatics are ingredients like garlic, green onions, shallots, ginger that are heated in some sort of fat/oil to release the flavor, cook these by themselves in the oil for 30 seconds to a minute, being careful not to burn them before adding the veggies.

Step 5: Serve and Enjoy!

Add a little culinary flare to your dish with garnishes such as cilantro, green onions, or sesame seeds for flavor and presentation. Enjoy a speedy, flavor packed meal!

Why a Wok??

The shape of the pan and constantly stirring helps make sure things aren’t over-cooked so veggies can retain their crunch and the aromatics don’t burn! When it’s time to add the sauce, push the contents to the side of the pan so they stop cooking on the most intense heat, and pour your sauce in the middle until thickens/boils before mixing it all together!

Recipes for Starters!